Tagged With nuclear proliferation

John Coster Mullen was driving his truck to a warehouse in Oshkosh Wisconsin when he told me that he owns uranium. He’d been talking on the phone for about hour, and I hadn’t been able to ask a single question about the project that has consumed a quarter century of his lifethe reverse-engineering of America’s first nuclear bomb. I was too engrossed to interrupt. The news of uranium, though, made me stutter.

French Licorne nuclear test, July 3, 1970.

There are currently about 15,000 nuclear warheads on Earth -- enough to blow our planet to kingdom come. It's complete overkill, literally. But how many nukes is enough to deter an enemy? And how many nukes could an aggressor nation drop on an enemy before the effects of nuclear winter come back to haunt them? A new study tackles these grim questions, but the answers aren't as satisfying or clear cut as the researchers would like to believe.

Earlier this month, North Korea announced the closure of its nuclear testing site, saying it's suspending all nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missile tests. The surprise move by President Kim Jong Un may be an attempt to ease relations prior to a summit with Donald Trump, but a new reports suggests the collapse of North Korea's test facility may have been a contributing factor.