Tagged With noaa

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Your new lock screen photos have arrived, courtesy of NOAA's heavily hyped GOES-16 Satellite. The orbiter, launched in November 2016, can take high definition photos of Earth every 15 minutes and one of the continental US every five minutes, according to a press release. Its combined speed and resolution will help scientists make more accurate forecasts, and allow them to spot severe weather earlier.

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For the third consecutive year, NASA and NOAA have announced record high temperatures. It's upsetting yet unsurprising, given the dearth of damns we seem to give about the state of our planet. As Gizmodo previously reported, temperatures were 0.04C higher last year than they were in 2015 — but the real reason this matters isn't because the planet's thermostat suddenly spiked. The overarching, disturbing trend is indisputable.

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Norm Nelson is interested in what makes the oceans tick. As a biological oceanographer at UC Santa Barbara, his research draws connections between sunlight and phytoplankton, the tiny green microbes that power the marine carbon cycle. There are plenty of outstanding questions Nelson wants to pursue — but after 30 productive years, his days as a scientist may be numbered.

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When climate change is in the news, it's usually because of a scary new temperature record or a mass coral die-off, or because an enormous chunk of Greenland disappeared and nobody noticed. But at the end of the day, the thing that most of us really care about is how we'll be affected. Now, NOAA is making it easier than ever to find out, with a new Climate Explorer app that shows just how screwed (or spared) your little sliver of the country will be.

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Space may be called the "final frontier" but what about unexplored areas that are on our very own Earth? The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been using the Okeanos Explorer to document uncharted waters since 2010 and it's off to do it again, this time at the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.