Tagged With nintendo switch

Earlier this week, Nintendo delighted Fortnite fans by announcing that the game, which might just be the most popular game being played right now, was coming to the Switch immediately. Even better, Switch players would be able to compete with PC and Xbox players, too - instant digital distribution and multiplayer open to all!

Nintendo's announcement felt like a dream come true after years of console makers refusing to play nice. But it isn't a dream, because Sony continues to flip the bird to its competitors and Fortnite players on the PS4 are being left out in the cold, unable to play with Xbox or Switch gamers.

E3 2018 is here, and companies have already announced more games than you can shake a Joy-Con at. But what about consoles? The last few years have seen E3 inundated with either rumours or news about new consoles from the big three. This year's gaming expo has been a touch on the lighter side when it comes to hardware announcements, but still had an interesting reveal or two from the show's biggest players. Depending on your console of choice, that might be a good thing.

Video: Before the Nintendo Switch, iPhone and even the Game Boy, the 1986 Sony Watchman was my first gadget obsession. When the digital TV switchover happened a few years ago, my handheld TV was relegated to a drawer as there's now nothing to watch on it. But that's why I'm super excited to see that someone has figured out how to get their Switch running on its tiny, black-and-white screen.

If you're living your life away from power outlets than at some point you'll need to invest in an external battery pack. Only not all batteries are the same. Aside from the various ports you might see on one, such as USB Type-A, micro USB or USB Type-C, it's also critical to consider the kind of power output your device requires if you want to actually juice up your laptop and phone.

First answer: it's easier to buy one. And that's cool. But there are people who, given a Raspberry Pi, a 3D printer and a stick of chewing gum, are going to build their own facsimile running emulation software so they can play whatever they like. Christopher Foote is one such person. The fruits of his labour: the "PiSwitch".

Oh Miitomo, it seems like it was just yesterday when you arrived on phones as Nintendo's first mobile app, bringing a tiny bit of that Mario joy and magic to the small screen. But after less than three years on the market, Nintendo is killing off the Miitomo app in just a few months on May 9.

Shared from Kotaku

This is what love is.

Love is patient. Love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonour others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs.

Except for that one time my 5-year-old son made me farm 9999 coins in Super Mario Odyssey so he could get the stupid Skeleton outfit. Nah mate. I'll definitely be keeping a record of that wrong.

Shared from Kotaku

Emulators have been doing some great work in getting Breath of the Wild just playable on the Switch, let alone to a nice state. But if you haven't checked in with their progress lately, wow have they come a long way.

Last weekend, a user calling themselves yellows8, posted an intriguing discovery to SwitchBrew.org, a site dedicated to finding ways to hack the Nintendo Switch. Hidden on every Switch console is a mysterious game called Flog, which turns out to be an emulated version of the 1984 NES game Golf upgraded with motion controls. An even bigger mystery was finding a way to actually play the game, and it turns out it's far from easy.