Tagged With nes

Do I need another portable gaming device weighing down my backpack every time I leave the house? My spine says no, but the retro gamer in me loves the idea of taking an NES with me wherever I roam. As handheld consoles go, My Arcade’s RetroChamp, announced at CES this year, pushes the boundaries of portable gaming. But for $US80 ($112), its versatility makes it worth a spot in your throwback console collection.

Thirty years after the original Game Boy was first released, handheld gaming is as popular as it’s ever been. Smartphones provide endless entertainment, and Nintendo’s current flagship console is even a portable device. But what if 1983-era technology had allowed the original NES to go portable? My Arcade’s new Retro Champ re-imagines Nintendo’s original 8-bit console as a Switch-like portable.

For five years, 8Bitdo has been creating near-perfect wireless clones of your favourite classic gamepads, improving the experience of emulating retro games on modern devices.

But if near-perfect isn’t perfect enough for your discerning gaming tastes, the company is now selling kits that should make it dead easy to upgrade your original Nintendo and Sega controllers with Bluetooth, without requiring any electronics know-how or soldering.

Every kid knows the best way to get almost every item on your Christmas list is to include one outlandish, obscenely expensive item your parents will never go for. Out of guilt, they will happily deliver everything else on your list. But you're an adult now, with a job and disposable income, so why not finally treat yourself to those top-tier items your parents would have scoffed at?

Shared from Lifehacker

When EB Games took pre-orders for the Nintendo Mini NES Classic earlier this week, the website crashed under the sheer volume of traffic from eager buyers. This happened two days in a row, leaving a mob of angry customers in its wake. With all the hype around the classic console, you'd think EB Games would have expected the level of traffic to its online store and worked to ensure its website was reliable. We take a look at where EB Games might have gone wrong and what businesses can learn from this debacle.

The Nintendo Entertainment System of the mid-1980s was a great home console, and 2016's miniaturised NES Classic Edition is a wonderful reimagining. You can buy one, too, as a Christmas present for yourself or your friends -- after the first shipment sold out entirely, a second lot, likely the last for the year, is due in early December.

But you'll have to pre-order if you want one; the Classic Mini NES is going to be extremely hard to come by.

The NES Classic Edition sold out everywhere in a matter of minutes yesterday. Nintendo has promised that more are on the way but that means you have to do things like wait and have patience. The internet is here to help. This video is a twofer. You can experience the vicarious joy of opening that sucker up and you can see what's in its guts just by clicking play.

Video: YouTube's HMS2 wields a hobby knife like ancient samurai warriors wielded their katana swords. And with the help of equally precise tools like tweezers and toothpicks, the master miniaturiser turned a bunch of thin plastic sheets into an impossibly tiny Famicom console -- the Japanese predecessor to the original NES.

Nothing shaped my childhood more than Nintendo. Like millions of other little kids, I got a Nintendo Entertainment System for Christmas in 1988. It changed my life. At the age of six, the Nintendo was my first real "gadget," and it was love at first sight. I don't know if I would do what I do today without it.

Let's be real for a second: The PlayStation 4 and Xbox One designs are hideous. Sure, both are great gaming consoles, but their cases employ the same look of every generic VCR from the 1980s. Thankfully, Etsy store-owner Decalgirl has a fix for that problem.