Tagged With nasa

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Astronomy has entered a new era, one where light and gravity both play a role in understanding the Universe's craziest phenomena. On August 17, 2017, over 70 observatories around (and above) the world, including ones like LIGO and the Hubble Space Telescope, all spotted a flash of energy. This light came in many different flavours, and was consistent with a pair of dense neutron stars colliding in a cataclysmic "kilonova" explosion.

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Video: We all know that fidget spinners are legit magic. (I mean, either that or a cheap steel bearing around some weighted plastic.) We also all know that space is cool. Put the two together -- fidget spinners in space -- and you have... a science lesson, courtesy of NASA?

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The Hubble Space Telescope is incredible and has done some truly remarkable science, but it's getting old. After all, it was launched in 1990. Taking its place is the James Webb Space Telescope, an $US8 billion-plus experiment that was scheduled to launch in October 2018.

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NASA's Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security -- Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft is hurtling through the void in order to link up with an asteroid named Bennu in 2018. While the intrepid spacecraft still has a way to go until its big rendezvous, it recently flew by Earth. It posed no immediate danger to our planet, but if you had a good telescope with a camera, you might have been able to snap a pic!

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The Cassini spacecraft, after 20 years of documenting Saturn, will bid us a fond farewell as it burns up in the atmosphere of Saturn later this evening.

We will be on the ground at the Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex documenting every step, and here's how you can watch too.

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Over the past few days, NASA's Curiosity rover has been making a steady climb towards a strange Martian ridge that's captivated scientists since before the mission even started. Known as Vera Ridge after the pioneering astrophysicist Vera Rubin, the durable outcrop could shed new light on the environment and potential habitability of ancient Mars. Although the climb has proven a challenging one, Curiosity has managed to capture some spectacular photos along the way.

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Space has a funny way of making us feel both incredibly small yet infinitely lucky for being part of such a vast cosmic sorority. Of course, humans have barely scratched the surface of the final frontier -- we've never even sent people beyond the Moon. While many uncrewed spacecraft have done an incredible job of revealing our solar neighbourhood to us, honestly, none did it better than NASA's Cassini probe. After exploring Saturn for 13 years, on September 15 at 9:55PM AEST, the probe will plunge itself into the planet's atmosphere, becoming one with the very object of its fascination.

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The end is nigh for NASA's Cassini spacecraft, the intrepid probe that's been studying the Saturn system for the last 13 years. On Friday, September 15, Cassini will plunge itself into Saturn's atmosphere with its antenna pointed toward Earth, becoming part of the place it's called home all these years.

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Image Cache: The universe is very good at making us feel both extremely insignificant and lucky enough to be part of something huge. No missions have made this clearer than NASA's Voyager spacecraft, which have been exploring the cosmos for 40 years. Yesterday, Voyager 1 officially turned the big 4-0, which it celebrated by cruising through interstellar space.

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Image Cache: As Cassini's tour of Saturn comes to a close, NASA's getting a bit nostalgic. This week, the space agency released a photo of Saturn's North pole the doomed spacecraft took on April 26 -- the day it started its Grand Finale. It's almost poetic to have a photo of Cassini staring into the void before it perishes within it.