Tagged With monster machines

Video: With thousands of cars passing through every day, blasting the walls with dirty exhaust, it only makes sense that every once in a while a tunnel needs to be cleaned. But I had no idea there are trucks built specifically for the task, with giant scrubbers attached to robotic arms that can reach every last nook and cranny.

Video: I've always wondered exactly who is buying Train Simulator 2015, because driving around virtual heavy machinery without causing accidents isn't really my idea of a good afternoon. But if that software is running in a fully immersive high-tech simulator, I start to understand the appeal.

You're probably aware that normal elevators make use of counterweights, which reduce the amount of energy it takes to move people up and down skyscrapers with slightly frightening speed. But when it comes to moving hundred-ton boats, a little more precision is required.

On July 1, 1960, Avro pilot Tony Blackman climbed into the cockpit of a Hawker Siddeley Vulcan delta wing strategic bomber in order to deliver her from the aircraft manufacturer (A.V. Roe and Company, Avro) for Royal Air Force service. The British four-jet aircraft dressed in antiflash white -- military serial XH558 -- was the 59th of the 136 Avro Vulcan medium range heavy bombers ever built. And this summer XH558, The Spirit of Great Britain, the last of her type is going to bid farewell to the skies.

These enormous devices you can see in this fisheye photo are the main parts of remote manipulator arms at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's radiochemistry hot cell facility, where highly radioactive materials are used to produce isotopes for medical purposes. Just look at the worker below, you can see how massive those arms really are.

This breathtaking photo shows the intense orange beam of a new 22W laser pointed at the planet Saturn. Wait, isn't this like the shocking scene in Star Wars where the Death Star's superlaser completely annihilated planet Alderaan?

Video: Tunnel-boring machines are genuine marvels of modern technology -- self-contained contraptions big enough to build entire subway tunnels, a job that used to require thousands of pick-axes and the sacrifice of quite a few lives. But once construction is finished, getting the machines out can take months.

Modern icebreakers are the most marvellous of civilian ships. They are huge, they are strong, they are powerful, and their history is amazing. Without them, there would be no safe waterways for other ships in the icy waters around the poles of the Earth. Here is a spectacular look into their evolution, from steamers and diesel vessels to nuclear powered ships.

European Space Agency engineers are going where no human will ever go. They have put a camera inside an automated spacecraft full of garbage (including sewage) to see what will happen during its reentry into Earth's atmosphere this weekend.

Ever wondered what machinery smartphone firms use to test out those shiny handsets they keep shifting by the truckload? I have. Well, they spend a full six months of the phone's now-year-long pre-release life just checking if they're fit for purpose, so that's got to be some pretty interesting, exhaustive probing and pummelling.

Competitive target shooting is as old as shooting weapons, from bows to laser pistols. But air pistols went through impressive evolution in the past few decades, thanks to manufacturers putting amazingly futuristic arms into the hands of competitors. Some of them look like Han Solo should be shooting.

The Matilda II Mark IV was an Allied infantry tank of the Second World War. Noted for its formidably armored hull, it was one of the primary tanks used by Australian Army regiments during New Guinea, Bougainville and Borneo campaigns. Last week, we stepped inside one of these 25-tonne death machines for an authentic taste of World War II driving. Here are the photos.