Tagged With monero

A flaw in ostensibly untraceable cryptocurrency Monero, which has picked up steam as market leader Bitcoin has stumbled in value, may make it possible to trace transactions - and since the entire history of Monero is encoded in its blockchain in what is now known to be a semi-vulnerable method, transactions that happened years ago could potentially be analysed for information on the parties involved.

Despite periodic crashes in the cryptocurrency markets, digital currency keeps on moving out of its formerly niche space and affecting the real world. Bitcoin-mining operations are now set to gobble more electricity than domestic residential consumption in Iceland, major credit card providers are banning purchases, rumoured scams as well as proven ones are rampant, and though some regulation has already been forthcoming authorities are largely playing catch-up.

Shared from Lifehacker Australia

So you've heard about Bitcoin and maybe even invested a little cash into it, hoping that its price continues to skyrocket. But Bitcoin isn't the only cryptocurrency looking to shake up the way that we process transactions around the world. There are hundreds of others that have slowly began rising to prominence as cryptocurrency becomes more mainstream.

It's one thing to wake up and discover that you missed the boat on a cryptocurrency boom that's making a handful of people very wealthy. It's another thing to find out that your computer is making someone else rich while it gives you poor performance and jacks up your electricity bill. With the spread of cryptojacking, that infuriating scenario is happening to more people.

When the WannaCry ransomware attack hit back in May, it was really good at causing chaos but not so great at generating ransom money. Some analysts said that the attackers were amateurish in their methods. If the people behind the malware are as clumsy as they seem, they should be worried, because they recently started moving what Bitcoin they did collect during a particularly perilous time for cyber criminals.