Tagged With mirrorless cameras

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Sony's brand new A9 is the most advanced camera that the company has ever made. In a lot of ways, it's the most advanced camera ever. It's a hell of a lot of power in a relatively small and unassuming camera. It's built for the highest of high-end professionals, sports photographers with the need for speed and the need for quality. It can fire off 20 frames in a single second, before you even realise that you're pressing the shutter button.

I, however, am just some Guy With Camera; I do not deserve a camera of this quality and with this feature-set. Nonetheless, here's what I learned in my time with a $7000 camera and even more than that again in high-end lenses.

3

Canon has completely failed at mirrorless cameras. Meanwhile, competitors like Olympus and Sony have both embraced and excelled at the format, which gives you DSLR quality images in a significantly smaller, and mirror-free body.

Canon has languished. Last year it even dragged it's feet on giving American audiences a taste at its newest mirrorless attempts. The Canon EOS M3 arrived in the US months after it was announced and available overseas. The new Canon EOS M5 will not wait so long.

4

Leica has spent the better part of the last decade peddling one or two great products, flanked by a bunch of overpriced "special editions", and some re-branded Panasonic cameras (also overpriced). The Leica Q finally brings something new to the table. I spent a weekend with the Q, and here are my thoughts.

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When I reviewed the Samsung NX1 earlier this year, I really liked its combination of large, versatile sensor, sturdy body and genuinely smart instant photo sharing. It made for a genuinely good all-rounder for photo enthusiasts. Now, Samsung has stuffed all the power of its pro-level NX1 into a camera that's a lot more compact, pocketable as well as cheaper.

1

Last week Sony Japan hit us with a surprise announcement of the A7 Mark II, an upgrade over the popular full-frame mirrorless camera. The initial launch was only for Asia, which left people on this side of the pond a bit confused. Well, we now have pricing and U.S. availability for the new cam that sports wicked in-body 5-axis stabilisation, along with other improvements.

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The thing about software is that it's... soft. Malleable! You can add neato things to it that make products better. Camera makers usually update a device's firmware with bug fixes and supposed "performance increases". Not so with the upcoming December update to Fujfilm's X-T1 mirrorless camera. It's replete with fancy new abilities.