Tagged With meteorolgoy

Last week, a team of intrepid storm chasers converged near Corpus Christi, Texas to witness the landfall of Hurricane Harvey, the storm that's brought over 127cm of rain to the Texas Gulf Coast and major flooding to the city of Houston. But these researchers collecting data for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) didn't just get the usual storm readings. They obtained weather balloon data they say have never before been collected from a hurricane in the history of the agency. Eventually, they hope the information acquired will help improve forecast models and prevent future disasters such as the flooding in Houston.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Last week, a team of intrepid storm chasers converged near Corpus Christi, Texas to witness the landfall of Hurricane Harvey, the storm that's brought over 127cm of rain to the Texas Gulf Coast and major flooding to the city of Houston. But these researchers collecting data for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) didn't just get the usual storm readings. They obtained weather balloon data they say have never before been collected from a hurricane in the history of the agency. Eventually, they hope the information acquired will help improve forecast models and prevent future disasters such as the flooding in Houston.