Tagged With medicine

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Video: This man is having the time of his life somehow, all while getting his severely fractured ankle put back into place.

NSFW language warning. Also you might laugh out loud.

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As you get older, colonoscopies become an important part of maintaining your health, allowing doctors to spot potentially fatal diseases like colon cancer before they progress too far. So medical researchers are hoping to make the procedure safer, and slightly less invasive, using a tiny capsule that's remotely steered around using a magnet outside your body.

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Apparently, eating cheese will not cause a heart attack or stroke, according to a new study that lots of folks are writing about. But readers, fellow science and health writers, can we please all agree to read these studies and think about them a little before we take them as the irreproachable word of some dairy overlord?

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Babies can't tell us how much pain they're in, which poses a problem for healthcare practitioners who are trying to manage their care. A new technique that uses non-invasive brain scans overcomes this frustrating limitation by providing what may be the first objective measure of infant pain.

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Stings from a Portuguese man o' war are as common as they are dangerous, yet there's a lack of consensus over the best way to treat these painful pricks. New research published in the journal Toxins reveals that stings from the man o' war (Physalia species) shouldn't be treated any differently than stings from jellyfish, a conclusion that upends conventional wisdom. And no, peeing on yourself is not recommended.

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If you distill life down into its most basic parts, you're here to do one thing: eat. Aside from a few days mandated by certain religions, every single day is a journey to consume enough food to make it to the next day. And maybe not get bored or uncomfortable along the way.

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Most of the time, when people talk about the cutting edge gene editing technology CRISPR, they are actually talking about CRISPR-Cas9. CRISPR, you see, is just one half of the genome editing tool, the programming that instructs where a DNA edit will actually be made. The other part consists of proteins that actually do the cutting. And one particular protein, called Cas9, has long been the snipping tool of choice. But now, there's a new protein on the block — and it may open the door to curing a devastating genetic disease.

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Following a head injury, patients typically undergo a CT scan to rule out brain bleeding. A new head worn device that scans the brain's electrical patterns has shown tremendous promise in clinical trials, presenting an inexpensive way for physicians to make a potentially life-saving diagnosis.

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Experts say it's not a matter of if, but when a global scale pandemic will wipe out millions of people. And we are grossly unprepared for the next major outbreak. But in the event of a devastating pandemic — whether it be triggered by a mutated strain of an existing virus or a bioengineered terror weapon — there are some practical things you can do, both before and during the outbreak, to increase your odds of survival.

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In a study that's bound to attract considerable controversy, a pair of researchers are claiming that between 60 and 66 per cent of all cancer-causing mutations are the result of random DNA copying errors, making them essentially unavoidable. The new research is offering important insights into how cancer emerges, and how it should be diagnosed and treated — but many questions remain.

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In Thailand, it's believed that throwing coins onto a turtle will bring longevity and good fortune. For many years, a female green sea turtle in the eastern town of Sri Racha had to endure this superstition while wading in a public pool. She consumed 915 coins in the process.

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Dietary supplements don't need to do anything, by definition. Tons of them don't. That might sound strange, since half of Americans take a vitamin or mineral supplement daily. But there are in fact, reasons to take some of them. Let's say you eat nothing but ground beef, Cheerios and Dr. Pepper every day. My nutritionist sister once saw a patient who lived this life. The human body, a machine that evolved over millions of years requiring a variety of different molecules to work best, was not optimised with a ground beef, Cheerios and Dr. Pepper-only diet in mind.

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Imagine that a doctor told you that your brain was slowly starting to self-destruct, that soon your once-healthy neurons would stop functioning, that you would lose all connection with reality, with the things and people that you loved. Then imagine that you found out that not only did that doctor make it all up, but he wasn't even actually a doctor. You would be pretty pissed, right?