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Most superheroes come prepackaged. Comic book history has long dictated their origins, powers and adversaries, and most superhero movies simply follow suit.

A rare exception comes in the form of Ant-Man and the Wasp’s villain. The character’s origins are muddy and their powers are rather malleable. So director Peyton Reed used those mysteries to craft a mostly new villain perfectly suited to his film.

Ant-Man and the Wasp is a decent movie. It has great action, funny quips, and a giant Hello Kitty Pez dispenser that knocks a guy off his motorcycle.

Unfortunately, I left the theatre disappointed. The movie focused so much on physical feats, both gargantuan and microscopic, that it forgot all about a very specific emotional arc the movie really could have used: A compelling mother-daughter relationship.

Video: Visual effects studio DNEG just released a behind-the-scenes look at its post-production work on the original Ant-Man movie, ahead of the sequel’s delayed release in the UK in a few weeks.

It’s no surprise that shrinking actors to the size of an ant requires extensive digital fakery, but even the film’s cameo by Thomas the Tank Engine (both the small and large versions) was realised through CG.

Ant-Man and the Wasp was born when director Peyton Reed first saw an early version of Captain America: Civil War.

In that film, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) is recruited to help Captain America fight Iron Man, and ends up revealing that in addition to shrinking, he can also grow very big.

As audience members, we can see that moment and just kind of enjoy it. But, with a new Ant-Man movie to make, Reed had a completely different thought.