Tagged With lenovo thinkpad x1 carbon review

I was walking through the office with Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 Carbon dangling between two fingers when my colleague spied the logo. "That was my first computer," she said with immeasurable fondness. The ThinkPad was a lot of people's first computer. Early ThinkPads were built like a tank and ran smooth like a spinning top. These days, the brand, which IBM sold to Lenovo a decade ago, doesn't have quite its 90s cachet, but its continues to be a workhorse -- and the new fifth generation of its stellar Carbon line is a slick refinement of everything you've ever loved about that familiar black machine.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

I was walking through the office with Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 Carbon dangling between two fingers when my colleague spied the logo. "That was my first computer," she said with immeasurable fondness. The ThinkPad was a lot of people's first computer. Early ThinkPads were built like a tank and ran smooth like a spinning top. These days, the brand, which IBM sold to Lenovo a decade ago, doesn't have quite its 90s cachet, but its continues to be a workhorse -- and the new fifth generation of its stellar Carbon line is a slick refinement of everything you've ever loved about that familiar black machine.