Tagged With legal

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Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif will resign his position immediately following a landmark decision by his country's Supreme Court. Sharif has been under fire since last year, when leaked documents appeared to show his family had hidden wealth in shell companies overseas. Earlier this month, investigators revealed that crucial financial documents provided by the Sharifs used Microsoft's Calibri font but were dated from before that font was publicly released.

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It's been a rough few years for photographer David Slater, the disputed owner of those monkey selfies from 2011. Slater found himself in an interesting legal quandary after his ownership of the famous photos was disputed by the likes of PETA and even Wikipedia. Now, Slater is apparently struggling financially, the costs of the ongoing court battles all but draining his coffers.

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The US Department of Justice is attempting to take its long-running legal battle with Microsoft over access to emails stored on foreign servers to the Supreme Court. After several delays, the Justice Department recently filed a petition asking the Supreme Court to take its case. An appeals court previously ruled in favour of Microsoft, finding the the Justice Department couldn't use a warrant to obtain messages from one of the company's overseas data centres and would have to request the data through an international treaty process instead.

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On Thursday, the US Center for Constitutional Rights challenged the NYPD's body camera policies, asking a judge to block the city's forthcoming pilot program, which is slated to outfit 1000 officers with body cameras as early as next week. The cameras were supposed to be a step forward for police accountability and transparency, but the CCR says the current policy dictating their use gives officers too much discretion about when to record, and makes it too difficult for the public to see the footage after the fact.

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As of now, Australia's telecommunications service providers have to store your metadata — records of your phone and internet activity, which can reveal a huge amount of detail — for two years. Approved government agencies can access that data without a warrant. It's not private information, either.

One way to circumvent Australia's draconian metadata retention scheme is to install and use a VPN on your phone and on your PC. Here's what a VPN is, what it does, and why — and how — you should get one.

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Uber's very bad year just got worse. The New York Times is reporting that the company used secret internal software as well as good old-fashioned cyberstalking to identify US law enforcement officials who were investigating Uber's business practices. The situation is even crazier than it sounds.

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A potentially major blow for privacy advocates occurred on Friday when a US magistrate ruled against Google and ordered it to cooperate with FBI search warrants demanding access to user emails that are stored on servers outside of the United States. The case is certain to spark a fight, because an appeals court ruled in favour of Microsoft in a similar case recently.

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With so much information online, coders can cook up scrapers to gather all sorts of data and present it in an interesting format. Even a topic as boring as patents can become a curious novelty just by looking up the ones expiring, say, today and making them browsable to the world at large. And that's Expatents in a nutshell.