Tagged With kotaku

Shared from Kotaku Australia

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"This needs to be, first and foremost, a good bar."

Out of everything I spoke to Lachlan McAllister and Jamie Skella, two of the founders behind the GGEZ esports bar (short for Good Game Easy) opening in Melbourne this week, that stuck with me the most.

Being Australia's first esports bar is important. But not as important as being a good bar.

Shared from Kotaku Australia

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In what will probably be the first and last time I'm excited for anything involving Rabbids, the biggest release this week is comfortably the unusual cross-over between Mario and Ubisoft.

But the list of big hitters doesn't stop there: the first episode of Life is Strange: Before the Storm drops this week, ARK: Survival Evolved comes out of Early Access, and RedOut gets a well-deserved console release. It's a big week in games, people.

Shared from Kotaku Australia

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In one of those wonderful romantic gestures you usually only read about, Aussie game developer Jackson Frew made a video game for his girlfriend.

"It was a top-down game, walking through a museum with photos of us on the walls and a message at the end wishing her a happy anniversary," he told Kotaku.

Frew thought this might be something that other people would like to do for their partners as well, and so - Heart2Game was born.

Shared from Kotaku

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Fidget spinners are taking the country by storm, as the Tamagotchi and yo-yo did before them. Unlike those other examples, spinners aren't necessarily toys, but rather concentration tools for distracted or hyperactive kids. They're being banned from schools all the same. In New York, you can grab one at pretty much any convenience store and twirl to your heart's content. If you can't grab one, we'll, there's an app.

Shared from Kotaku

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And in a week where the world is grappling with the consequences of just how vulnerable computers are is this joyous nugget of news: more Australians are using Windows XP than Windows 8.1, even though support for the former was officially canned years ago.

Shared from Kotaku

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It's not often you see developers bragging about games running on a 7MHz CPU. But when you're remaking a machine that first hit the market in 1982, 7MHz is actually a hell of a lot.

Shared from Kotaku

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After much anticipation, a package rocked up at the Kotaku offices this week. We get a lot of packages coming through the doors, especially when you share space with fashion websites, the fast-food junkies at Lifehacker and the rotating carousel of mobiles that rolls into Gizmodo.

But this package was special. It was a mouse, not that I needed another. But it was new and that was enough to be exciting.

Shared from Kotaku

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I always thought this should have been a launch feature, but not to worry, it's available now thanks to the latest PlayStation 4 firmware update.

If you have a PlayStation 4 Pro, and you're playing one of those pesky games that haven't been patched for PRO PERFORMANCE, you can now activate 'boost mode' to make them perform better.

Shared from Kotaku

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Not long after the first Deathadder launched, there was discussion amongst Counter-Strike circles about what was the best mouse to buy. The Intellimouse Optical or Logitech's MX500 were the two favourites. But Microsoft had canned production of the former, and the shape of Logitech's offerings (with the concave indent for your thumb) was very particular, and not at all conducive for certain mouse grips. So if you were in the market for a new mouse, or your Intellimouse had just died, what was a gamer to do?

The go-to mouse became the Deathadder: it had the same shape as the fat Intellimouse Optical mice, the optical sensor was just as reliable at the end of a tournament as it was at home, and it felt good in the hand. Razer's since refreshed the Deathadder line with the Deathadder Elite, and it's just as good as the original Deathadder was over a decade ago.