Tagged With knives

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Video: If I saw this deeply rusted cleaver in the garbage, I'd leave it exactly where it was, because I wouldn't think there was any way to save the thing. Luckily, the person salvaging this ruined butcher's knife is way smarter and way more resourceful than me. In less than three hours, he turned a destroyed knife into what looks like a brand-spanking new blade that can chop the hell out of anything.

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There are so many reasons to try this at home tonight: you get to see the metal blade burn that glorious fiery orange red, you get to hear inanimate objects make weird whining sounds as they get sliced open, you get to imagine what spontaneous self-combustion would be like, and in some cases you might even spot what looks like souls escaping from a bar of soap (that's probably my favourite thing that gets cut).

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Video: I'm a total sucker for watching old tools get turned into badarse blades, because seeing random objects get weaponised is such silly dangerous fun. That used to be a thing that tightened bolts! Now it's a knife that will slice your eyes out. Plus, it looks cool as hell. This time, Miller Knives took a monkey wrench and forged it into a swashbuckling knife by the tried and true method of heating it up, bludgeoning it to hell and sharpening it into a deadly curved knife. The wrench's jaws act as the handle.

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Video: There's nothing odd about this. There's nothing surprising about it either. If you watch a very hot knife cut through a piece of styrofoam, it's going to be exactly as satisfying as you'd think it'd be.. The styrofoam shrivels up after each cut and turns into this goo that looks more like a marshmallow than anything else.

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Video: You can basically transform anything made out of metal into a working knife — if you blast it with enough heat, pound it enough times with a hammer and then sharpen it over and over again. Even an old horseshoe can become an implement of danger. Watch as Miller Knives uses the U-shape of the shoe to cook up a pretty looking blade with a bad arse curved handle. That bend is sweet.

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Video: In order to harden the edge of steel, swords are often heated until they're impossibly hot and then quenched in liquid to rapidly cool down. This creates a much stronger grain structure in the steel which obviously leads to a much stronger sword. An interesting thing that happens during this quenching process is how the sword dramatically bends before it snaps back into shape (with a slight upward tilt).