Tagged With keyboards

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Despite all the extraordinary advances in technology — particularly computing technology — there is one place where we've languished. It's a key facet of the future that was, in many ways, better in 1987 than in 2017: The keyboard.

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With the rise and rise of small, powerful PCs like the MSI Vortex G65 that can live beside a TV rather than alongside a computer monitor, PC games are increasingly being played in living rooms — like your console on steroids — rather than at a desk or in a home office. To game from the couch, though, requires a little extra effort, because you're juggling a keyboard and mouse rather than an all-in-one handheld controller. A lapboard like the Roccat Sova makes it easy to sit back on a lounge and type and scroll away with the traditional PC gaming setup that you're familiar with.

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There's been plenty of mechanical keyboards on the market. I've even reviewed a few. But no matter how good the build quality, no matter how good the typing experience is, most mechanical keyboards tend to suffer the same problem: the asking price is simply too much.

Corsair's K70 LUX RGB mechanical keyboard is the first I've tried in a year that I'd feel comfortable recommending, striking a nice balance between features and design without being too expensive or ostentatious.

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Of course one-handed keyboards exist. Sure, it's not a peripheral you'd give much thought to (if ever), but circumstances could necessitate the need for a typing device you can use with a single limb. Maltron is one such provider and its range of Single Hand keyboards look as futuristic as they do retro.

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Microsoft's Surface laptop-tablet hybrid has gone through a huge number of small, often unnoticeable tweaks in its journey from the original Surface Pro of 2013 to the current Surface Pro 4. While the tablet itself gets a lot of attention for the evolution of its kickstand and touchscreen and angular slate design, the humble Type Cover, a nearly mandatory accessory, doesn't get as much love. Microsoft went to pains, though, in the creation of the Signature Edition version of the Type Cover — a slim, slick, refined piece of hardware that represents the best of Surface and of Microsoft itself.