Tagged With irma

Before us humans drained it, South Florida was first and foremost a swamp. Infrastructure improvements went in to make it look the way it is today, with its sewers and drainage systems built to take water back to the ocean. But when Hurricane Irma made itself known last week, it brought back old memories of the aged infrastructure, confirming a prediction made by Quartz.

Video: This weekend, Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida, with hundreds of thousands of people sheltering in place as the storm tracked a path across the state. Among those sheltering was Kristen Bell -- who decided to help cheer up gathered Floridians by performing Frozen hits at a nearby shelter.

Irma, which made landfall in the Florida Keys yesterday as a Category 4 hurricane, has now been downgraded to a tropical storm. The system, which is now 644km wide, may have lost some strength, but it's continuing to produce heavy winds and rain as it marches northwards towards Georgia.

Meteorologists were at a loss for words yesterday as Hurricane Irma intensified into a enormous, record-smashing Category 5. Packing "catastrophic" and "life-threatening" winds of 300km/h, the storm now bearing down on Puerto Rico and the US Virgin islands is officially the strongest Atlantic hurricane ever recorded north of the Caribbean and east of Florida. But how did it get to be such a monster?