Tagged With iphone xs

Sometime in the flurry of news surrounding the new iPad Pro and the new MacBook Air, Apple quietly added the iPhone 5 to its list of "vintage and obsolete products" in the United States. There it sits, alongside the Apple III, the Newton MessagePad, and the first four generations of iPhone, as a thing that Apple officially no longer repairs or updates. The iPhone 5 is effectively dead, and the rest of Apple's small-hands phones aren't far behind.

It's been a few weeks since the iPhone XS and XS Max hit the shelves, and now its time for the younger sibling. The iPhone XR is now on sale - this is what you need to know.

The iPhone XR hits stores on Friday, and everybody is flipping out about it being the most affordable new iPhone. Starting at $1,229, however, the XR isn’t actually that much cheaper in the grander scheme of things.

And yet, to the casual observer, the device also looks a heck of a lot like the undeniably expensive iPhone XS, which starts at $1,629. But deciding between the two new iPhone models isn’t quite the $400 proposition it seems to be.

It wouldn’t be an iPhone launch without a small army of hand-wringing Apple fans complaining about their expensive new phones on the internet. This year is no exception, and forums are filling up with reports of issues with the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max. None of the problems are particularly catastrophic. At least not yet.

I’m sick of buying iPhones. For the past decade, I’ve been buying them and loving them and breaking them and losing them and replacing them and, when September comes along, upgrading them.

Last year, it cost me over $1579 to get an iPhone X, and against my better judgment, I’m very seriously considering spending even more money to get the iPhone XS.

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It used to be that the cheapest way to buy a new smartphone, especially a costly handset like the iPhone, was to pay for it outright. But with the price of phones doubling over the past couple of years, is an outright purchase still the way to go?

Apple’s hyped up new iPhones hold a lot of allure. Clad in a silver, space grey or a rich gold finish and featuring the new A12 Bionic chip inside, the recently-debuted iPhone XS represents the best tech Apple can jam in a phone. So naturally, one of the first things people did after getting their hands on one was tear it apart and see what’s inside. And would you just look at that battery?

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Now that the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max are out some folks will be standing at their local phone store wondering whether to outlay megabucks for Apple's new uber-phones or splash out on a smartphone from Samsung's Galaxy range. What are the key factors when choosing between the latest Apple smartphones and the Samsung Galaxy Note 9?

The iPhone XS and XS Max are finally available for pre-order and will be released on September 21. Even though it's just an 's' year for Apple, there are plenty of people who are excited to get their hands on on a new model.

But not everyone can afford to buy outright, especially when Apple has continued its tradition of selling extremely expensive phones. If you're looking at getting on a plan instead, these are the ones you should consider.

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Cast your eyes on this promotional image for the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max. They look lovely, don't they? If you haven't been keeping abreast of iPhone news, you would be forgiven for thinking these phones boast full-screen, bezel-free displays.

In reality, both models come equipped with an obtrusive notch. This can only mean one of two things: either Apple is ashamed of the notch, or it is deliberately trying to mislead consumers.

There's dread in my bones at every iPhone event now. Tim Cook and his pals stand on that stage and they smile up at the audience and they patiently explain to us why their new phones are their best phones even though those same phones have gotten too damn big. It seems like it's been happening that way forever and is gonna keep happening until we're balancing 50-inch TVs on our shoulders to talk to family and friends.