Tagged With ios 11

Software updates are exciting. I keep telling my friends this, and when they get behind on their updates, I’m all, “Hey, you’re missing out on good stuff!” This is part of the reason why I’m sometimes the guy who downloads beta versions of software. The bugs are annoying, but hey, the features are better.

This approach recently backfired on me with macOS and iOS 12. Unexpectedly, I think the resulting disaster made me a better computer user.

The iPhone X is easily the best phone I've ever owned. And in almost every way, it performs exactly as I would like it to. There is just one problem, a thing that might seem so minor as to not be an issue at all but is the one thing that regularly makes me contemplate chucking my $1600 gadget against a brick wall.

At an education-focused event in Chicago, Apple announced more than just a stylus-friendly iPad. The company also revealed some new features coming to its office and productivity software, as well as new education tools for teachers, school administrators and developers. All told, the event seemed like Apple's way of saying something it's been wanting to say for some time: Stop buying Chromebooks, please.

What started out as a seemingly simple bug turned into a real hassle when people figured out it was possible to crash iMessage, Twitter or even the Wi-Fi app on Apple products by inserting a single character from the Indian language of Telugu. And once an app had crashed, it would keep crashing forever until you took somewhat extreme measures such as deleting and reinstalling the app, erasing entire conversation threads, or upgrading to a beta version of your device's OS.

For years, people have complained about declining performance in their ageing iPhones, an issue that's commonly attributed to Apple's software updates. Something beyond a rumour percolated just last week, when a Reddit thread suggested that the cause for the slow performance could be due to Apple throttling phones with degraded batteries. This inspired the makers of Geekbench, a widely used synthetic benchmarking app, to give data gathered from thousands of phones using Geekbench a closer look. The data, according to Geekbench, indicates that there may actually be a link between software updates and old batteries when it comes to poor performance.

People like to believe that Apple is a company that never makes mistakes. Never has that logic been so obviously flawed as it was in 2017. This year, it seemed like Apple couldn't make it through a single week without some big, embarrassing screw up. So, for the sheer joy of it, we made a list.

Apple's iOS is a walled garden that gives the company total control over what can be done with its device. For years, jailbreaking your iPhone was easy and allowed all sorts of custom freedom. It's been a while since a simple jailbreak has been released. But this week, a Google researcher made an announcement that has the dying jailbreak community ready to get crackin'.

Ever since it launched in September, iOS 11 has been riddled with glitches, bad UI decisions and general lack of attention to detail. On Friday night, Apple's problems got a little worse with a notifications bug that sent iPhones and iPads running the software into a constant cycle of crashing and rebooting, forcing Apple to issue an immediate update.

OK, look. I'm not the first person to say this, and I certainly won't be the last. But iOS 11 is bad. The new operating system has turned my phone into a bug-infested carcass of its former self, and the frustration of trying to use it sometimes makes me want to die, too.

iOS 11, the fancy new version of Apple's OS that shipped just about two months before the launch of its latest line of expensive phones, introduced some changes to Control Center, its app which streamlines the annoying process of changing settings by putting the most commonly tweaked ones on a single swipe-up menu. One issue? The changes included buttons that appeared to be convenient Wi-Fi and Bluetooth switches, but in reality simply disconnected phones from nearby devices and networks instead of turning the chips off.

I'm a total gadget nerd, and it's been five years since a new smartphone made me nod to myself with the understanding that, "Yes, I need that thing more than I need air." But the buzz around the iPhone X has had me a little more hyped than usual.

Not just because the iPhone finally ditched the bezels and got an OLED display -- Samsung's Galaxy S8 lost its bezels in March -- but because the iPhone X is the line's first significant overhaul since the iPhone 4. I should know better than to fall for the hype, but after spending nearly a week with the device, I've actually convinced myself that spending $1579 on a phone seems like a good idea. If you hate me for saying that, that's OK, I hate me too.

Shared from SMH

The iPhone X is a weird and wonderful device. Apple's new phone looks and behaves so differently to the iPhones we're used to, but it takes just a day or two to become familiar with it. Apple has been subtly training us for life without a home button over the past few iterations of iOS by emphasising swipe gestures, and the iPhone X benefits from this established muscle memory.

I've only had a few days to play with the iPhone X, so I can't reliably comment on things such as battery life, but here are my first impressions of Apple's tenth anniversary flagship phone.

The iPhone X's lack of a physical home button is the most significant update to Apple's world-changing smartphone since the original iPhone's launch in 2007. I've had an iPhone X for the last day, and I'm still getting my head around the new list of gestures and interactions -- so here's what I've learned. If you want a quick guide to everything new before you get your own new iPhone X on Friday, here's your cheat sheet.