Tagged With interplanetary transport system

Yesterday, billionaire tech entrepreneur and noted late guy Elon Musk unveiled his hotly-anticipated plan to send humans to live -- and die -- on Mars. And not just a few humans: A lot of them. In a talk that wavered between overreaching science fair presentation and straight-up science fiction, Musk described sending fleets of spacecraft, each packed hundreds of colonists, to live on a dusty, airless wasteland that we're apparently going to fix up with nuclear reactors and artificial magnetic fields.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

SpaceX has been talking up its Martian travel plans for a while now, but we still don't know how it intends to get (or survive) there. As of yesterday, however, it's cleared a major hurdle: The rocket engine it will use to get to the Red Planet just fired-up for the first time.