Tagged With impossible physics

When NASA scientists think they have built something that breaks the laws of physics, do you take them at their word?

Science has long buzzed about an "impossible" rocket thruster, one that looks like an air blaster you'd buy at Disney Land and somehow generates thrust without propellant to push it forward. The so-called electromagnetic or EM drive makes headlines annually, but this year is different: An American team working on the drive released a peer-reviewed paper demonstrating that their prototype works, and a Chinese team claims that they have tested their own functional model.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

When NASA scientists think they have built something that breaks the laws of physics, do you take them at their word?

Science has long buzzed about an "impossible" rocket thruster, one that looks like an air blaster you'd buy at Disney Land and somehow generates thrust without propellant to push it forward. The so-called electromagnetic or EM drive makes headlines annually, but this year is different: An American team working on the drive released a peer-reviewed paper demonstrating that their prototype works, and a Chinese team claims that they have tested their own functional model.