Tagged With image cache

Image Cache: It's already been quite a year for space porn, so sometimes I feel excessive by posting yet another new picture and saying "Look at this! It looks really cool!" But you know what? We're hard-working people who deserve a break to marvel at the universe. So take in this incredible new image of the Tarantula Nebula, a high-energy region full of baby stars in a neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

Image Cache: Stranger Things is one of those shows that resonates in a very specific way for people who grew up in the 1980s. Much like NBC's short-lived series Freaks and Geeks, Stranger Things delicately recreates the time period, going beyond nostalgia to something that feels authentic and familiar. One artist has captured that with his own series, taking the episode titles from Stranger Things 2 and giving them a nostalgic look of their own.

Image Cache: The universe is very good at making us feel both extremely insignificant and lucky enough to be part of something huge. No missions have made this clearer than NASA's Voyager spacecraft, which have been exploring the cosmos for 40 years. Yesterday, Voyager 1 officially turned the big 4-0, which it celebrated by cruising through interstellar space.

Image Cache: As Cassini's tour of Saturn comes to a close, NASA's getting a bit nostalgic. This week, the space agency released a photo of Saturn's North pole the doomed spacecraft took on April 26 -- the day it started its Grand Finale. It's almost poetic to have a photo of Cassini staring into the void before it perishes within it.

Image Cache: Nature can be brutal as hell. The Circle of Life translates to a horrible place full of awful smells, corpses, murder, and plenty of unreasonably upsetting crap. Looking at pictures of nature, however, is a completely different story. It's soothing. It's nice. There isn't as much blood, generally.

Image Cache: When you capture Australia at just the right angle, it can look more than foreign -- it can look properly alien. That's the end result of these photos from Canon's 'Down Under From Above' aerial photography project, which turn Shark Bay on the WA coast into an orange and teal masterpiece that looks like something out of The Martian.