Tagged With icos

Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. These three words are the bane of Bitcoiners' existence. Cryptocurrency enthusiasts use the acronym FUD to describe any negativity that might be swirling around the market that causes prices to drop. And the FUD was strong this week, when the whole cryptocurrency ecosphere got fucked.

After months of tension over what, if anything, the US Securities and Exchange Commission was planning to do about cryptocurrencies and the billions of dollars people have sunk into initial coin offerings - a form of barely regulated investment vehicle in which investors trade real cash for tokens in crypto-backed startups - the agency's chairman Jay Clayton has finally weighed in.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

The US Securities and Exchange Commission launched a new cyber fraud unit earlier this year amid the internet's ongoing Bitcoin boom, seemingly telegraphing its intent to crack down on a cryptocurrency market rife with hacking, fraud and scams. The first thing on its agenda was likely always going to be initial coin offerings - a form of almost totally unregulated investment vehicle in which investors trade things of real value, such as cash, in exchange for stakes in cryptocurrency-backed startups.

A few weeks ago, Jordan Belfort - the notorious "Wolf of Wall Street" and convicted financial scam artist - warned the entire internet not to get into sketchy cryptocurrency-backed startups. Specifically, he warned that initial coin offerings, a form of almost completely unregulated investment vehicle where crypto-backed startups offer blockchain-based "tokens" in exchange for things of real value like cash, were the "biggest scam ever, such a huge gigantic scam that's going to blow up in so many people's faces".

A hustler knows a hustle. So if you have ever considered sinking money into an initial coin offering -- a complicated, barely regulated, and booming new form of financial vehicle where startups offer investors stakes in "new" cryptocurrencies rather than traditional stock -- it might be a good idea to listen to what one of finance's most notorious criminals-turned-authors has to say.