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In some industries, sex sells. In the science journalism industry, however, potentially killer asteroids sell even more. Due to a quirk of how NASA refers to the many asteroids it tracks, countless headlines such as "Massive and Potentially Dangerous Asteroid Will Approach Earth Tonight" and "'Potentially Hazardous' Asteroid to Pass by Earth on Super Bowl Sunday" fill Google News every month. Those aren't tabloids - they're from Newsweek and New York Magazine, respectively. The problem is, NASA's definition of "potentially hazardous" isn't the same as the general public's.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

In some industries, sex sells. In the science journalism industry, however, potentially killer asteroids sell even more. Due to a quirk of how NASA refers to the many asteroids it tracks, countless headlines such as "Massive and Potentially Dangerous Asteroid Will Approach Earth Tonight" and "'Potentially Hazardous' Asteroid to Pass by Earth on Super Bowl Sunday" fill Google News every month. Those aren't tabloids - they're from Newsweek and New York Magazine, respectively. The problem is, NASA's definition of "potentially hazardous" isn't the same as the general public's.