Tagged With hulu

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You've read the book, you're anxiously awaiting the show's arrival in Australia, and you've spent the past week repeating "Nolite te bastardes carborundorum, bitches!" Hulu's excellent adaptation of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale is equal parts invigorating and infuriating — and its themes couldn't be more eerily timely. Here's 10 works that capture that same feeling.

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I have a few beefs with Hulu's adaptation of the notable novel that has set many a school girl on a path to feminism and rejection of fuckbois. There's obviously my disappointment with Serena Joy's transformation from spackled mess of a Tammy Faye icon to coiffed Ivanka Trump twin (mainly because I want to see Yvonne Strahovski in an '80s church lady bouffant), but my largest beef with the show is with the lack of a certain element near and dear to every chef's heart: Butter.

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The first three episodes of The Handmaid's Tale are now available on Hulu in the US. Though an Australian broadcaster has not yet been announced, we've already given our thoughts on the series, which remains mostly faithful to Margaret Atwood's 1985 dystopian novel of the same name. But there are some changes, some big, some small, that separate the two — and we've broken them down for you here.

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Starting today, Americans can stream the first three episodes of Hulu's new sci-fi anthology, Dimension 404. (An Australian broadcast has not yet been announced.) While the show wears its many influences rather prominently — The Twilight Zone and Black Mirror are the most obvious — it does so in an enjoyable way, with great casting that makes a huge difference.

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Talk to any British expat in the US and ask them what they miss most from home, and it's likely to be one of three things: Free healthcare, Cadbury's Dairy Milk and British TV. Australia is better than the US for the first two areas, but still sadly deficient in the third. Specifically, Brits like me miss iPlayer, the BBC's free service that allows you to stream BBC TV shows — if you're in the UK. If you're not, you can only access radio programs, which is great if you miss Radio 4 but not if you want to stay caught up on Doctor Who or The Great British Bake Off. Instead, expats have to resort to illegal streaming sites or VPNs to access many of their favourite shows.