Tagged With history

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In 1911, two teams -- one from Norway and one from Britain -- vied to become the first to reach the South Pole. Led by Roald Amundsen, the Norwegian team won the race, while all five members of Robert Falcon Scott's Terra Nova Expedition perished on the return journey home. New research suggests Amundsen's team may have benefited from an early start, taking advantage of an unusually warm Antarctic summer.

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In 1944, Marcel Nadjari -- a Greek Jew who was forced to remove bodies from the Auschwitz gas chambers -- buried a letter in a forest near the camp. The text was rediscovered in 1980, but it was virtually unreadable. Using a new imaging technique, scientists have finally reconstructed the letter, and it's providing harrowing new details of the Holocaust -- and what it was like to work as a forced labourer in a Nazi extermination camp.

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The number zero is something we all take for granted, yet its conceptual origin has eluded archaeologists and historians. An updated analysis of an ancient Indian manuscript is shedding new light on this longstanding mystery, showing that the symbol that would eventually evolve into the number zero emerged at least 500 years earlier than previously thought.

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Stories and poems from the Medieval era contain accounts of fearsome female Viking warriors, yet historians and anthropologists have argued that such accounts are based in myth. A DNA analysis of a 10th century skeleton found in an iconic Swedish Viking Age grave suggests there's some truth to these old tales -- and that women stood alongside men on the battlefield.

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In idyllic places such as the Catskills and the Poconos, the '50s and '60s were a uniquely magical time for America. This was where newly suburban denizens went on holiday, flocking to lakeside resorts straight out of Dirty Dancing. But over the years, the people stopped coming, and the resorts closed. Now, their moss-covered ruins look like a tomb of the American dream.

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When we think about wine in Italian history, we think of the booze-soaked bacchanalias of ancient Rome. But it turns out that Italians were using wine to get their drunk on long before that, as evidenced by an exciting new discovery of the region's oldest vino near a Copper Age site in Sicily. It's a spicy meatball indeed.

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There are very few absolutely true things in this life, but one of them is you shouldn't drink lead. Historians have long believed that ancient Romans learned this the hard way -- it's been said that lead used in water pipes and cooking materials could have poisoned Romans and contributed to their downfall. Now, new research has complicated this age-old mystery, suggesting the real culprit was something even more toxic.

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During the latter stages of the American Civil War, the H.L. Hunley made history by becoming the first combat submarine to sink an enemy ship. The Confederate crew never returned from its mission, sparking a mystery that's lasted for over 130 years. An exhaustive new analysis suggests these pioneering submariners didn't drown or suffocate as commonly believed, but instead died from the shockwave triggered by their very own weapon.