Tagged With historical ecology

Old sailor's tales about the seas being so full of fish you could walk on them, or oysters the size of Frisbees, tend to inspire scepticism today, and for good reason -- many people have very little direct experience with the oceans, except for the occasional news article about how we've screwed it up beyond repair. But the oceans of yesteryear really were more plentiful than they are today, and a new analysis of 240 year-old nautical charts hints at just how dramatically things have changed.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Old sailor's tales about the seas being so full of fish you could walk on them, or oysters the size of Frisbees, tend to inspire scepticism today, and for good reason -- many people have very little direct experience with the oceans, except for the occasional news article about how we've screwed it up beyond repair. But the oceans of yesteryear really were more plentiful than they are today, and a new analysis of 240 year-old nautical charts hints at just how dramatically things have changed.