Tagged With health

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Over the past nine months, the number of US cases of an emerging, multi-drug resistant fungus has ballooned from seven to more than 122. What's more, the fungus, Candida auris, seems to be spreading, according to a field report the Centres for Disease Control released Thursday.

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You've got data pouring in from your connected fitness tracker, your smartphone, your smartwatch, the smart scales in your bathroom and the dieting app you use to log your meals — so how do you get all of this information in one place? It isn't easy, but here are a few pointers to help.

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In 59 years, NASA has flown more than 50 women into space. That might seem like a reasonable number, but when you consider the space agency has flown hundreds of men over the same time period, it's a tad unsettling. If we ever want to actually colonise a planet like Mars, we're going to have bring hundreds of women, or thousands.

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New research from Nationwide Children's Hospital shows that around 12,500 kids are treated in US hospital emergency departments each year for injuries caused by cotton tip applicators. That's about 34 each day. In most cases, the swabs were used for cleaning, but as this study shows, it's simply not worth the risks. Thankfully, there are safer ways to get rid of that gunk in your ear holes.

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As you get older, colonoscopies become an important part of maintaining your health, allowing doctors to spot potentially fatal diseases like colon cancer before they progress too far. So medical researchers are hoping to make the procedure safer, and slightly less invasive, using a tiny capsule that's remotely steered around using a magnet outside your body.

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As Republican politicians take aim at the Affordable Care Act and present their reasoned alternative, the Kill The Poor And Turn Them Into Chef Boyardee Act of 2017, it's a good time to remember a distinctive element of healthcare in the US: Inequality, particularly income inequality.

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Apparently, eating cheese will not cause a heart attack or stroke, according to a new study that lots of folks are writing about. But readers, fellow science and health writers, can we please all agree to read these studies and think about them a little before we take them as the irreproachable word of some dairy overlord?

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Brian Kateman, like many once-vegetarians, wasn't perfect. But he wasn't trying to be. One Thanksgiving during his university years, Kateman recalls reaching for a piece of turkey, which he permitted himself because of the special occasion. His older sister, predictably, started making fun of him.

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If you distill life down into its most basic parts, you're here to do one thing: eat. Aside from a few days mandated by certain religions, every single day is a journey to consume enough food to make it to the next day. And maybe not get bored or uncomfortable along the way.

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For years, we've been told that strapping a fitness tracker to your wrist is a great way to track your physical activity and fitness level. But researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have come up with a non-invasive, non-wearable way to do the same thing — and more accurately — using invisible wireless signals.

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As anyone who has ridden in an old train through a long tunnel knows, the air down there is unpleasant. New research done in Canada shows that air pollution levels in Toronto's subway system are ten times greater than those above ground. It's a troubling realisation for subway-goers, but there are ways to keep these underground systems clean.

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Over 30 thousand runners began the Boston Marathon this week in Hopkinton, MA, some having trained and run for years to get to this point. Their completion medals will be well-earned. From your heart, through your circulatory system, to your leg muscles and kidneys, running a marathon is sort of like putting your entire body through a meat grinder.

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Needle exchange programs are generally considered a huge success. In New York state, the programs have been credited with virtually eradicating the transmission of AIDS through contaminated needles. Now, in an effort to further crack down on disease transmission via shared needles, Las Vegas has become the first city in the US to install a clean needle vending machine.

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Experts say it's not a matter of if, but when a global scale pandemic will wipe out millions of people. And we are grossly unprepared for the next major outbreak. But in the event of a devastating pandemic — whether it be triggered by a mutated strain of an existing virus or a bioengineered terror weapon — there are some practical things you can do, both before and during the outbreak, to increase your odds of survival.

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If you are a woman, the odds are pretty good that you have experienced the agony and annoyance of a urinary tract infection at some point in your life. And if you are a particularly unlucky woman, you might experience them on the regular. While women often swear sex is the culprit of a UTI showing up again, as far as science is concerned, exactly why these recurring infections happen has been a mystery.

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While we all want to travel, live and bang in space, there are some pretty major things to consider, such as the fact that our sentient flesh cocoons were not designed to handle the harsh conditions of the cosmic void. Though research like NASA's Twin Study will illuminate some of the potential impacts of extended spaceflight on our bodies, so many mysteries remain — particularly when it comes to what's going to happen to our DNA.

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In our eventual feminist utopia, birth control will be available in vending machines, water parks, and even those lip-gloss-and-tampon dispensers in movie theatre bathrooms. But unfortunately, obtaining oral contraceptive birth control in the US these days is both expensive and enigmatic, especially if you're young and/or uninsured: Currently, 47 states and the District of Columbia require a doctor's prescription in order to obtain the pill. Issues of access are likely to get a lot worse once the Affordable Care Act is repealed and replaced by whatever nonsensical Frankenstein bill Paul Ryan put together during his lunch break.

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Researchers have identified the Tsimane people as having the healthiest hearts in the world. As expected, diet and exercise are believed to be responsible for the populations incredible heart health well into old age. What's perhaps most surprising about their diet is how heavy it is in carbs.