Tagged With health

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It's that time of year again - when we are inundated with information about what the next great wellness blogger will be instagramming non-stop as a cure-all for, well, all.

So what do the experts make of this year's biggest trends - hemp, proats, flexatarianism, adaptogens and seaweed? I spoke to nutritionist Catherine Saxelby from Foodwatch to find out.

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By using an artificially intelligent algorithm to predict patient mortality, a research team from Stanford University is hoping to improve the timing of end-of-life care for critically ill patients. In tests, the system proved eerily accurate, correctly predicting mortality outcomes in 90 per cent of cases. But while the system is able to predict when a patient might die, it still cannot tell doctors how it came to its conclusion.

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If you've decided, this year, to start working out, you might have noticed a strange phenomenon: You'll leave the gym feeling fine, and then two days later wake up sore. This weird time-lag appears unique to exercise, and is, when you think about it, kind of inexplicable - like stubbing your toe, feeling nothing, and then two days later suddenly yelping in pain.

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When it comes to ergonomics, we put a lot of focus on posture, specifically sitting at a desk. But posture is important regardless of what you're doing, including carrying a camera bag around. So, if you're a keen photographer and wondering why you're getting headaches and shoulder pain, it might be time to reconsider your choice of backpack.

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Imagine making a spreadsheet of every meal you've ever eaten, every hand you've ever shook, every bit of dust that's ever gotten in your eye - and multiply it by about a million times. Then you begin to get a sense of the size of the data problem that is your body's immune system. Through a new AI project, Microsoft hopes to solve this data problem and make diagnosing nearly any disease as simple as a single blood test.

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Rich people have had a good 2017, with the stock market and the accumulated net wealth of the top ten per cent of earners skyrocketing and the passage of a radical US tax bill designed to inflate their wallets further. So in yet another infuriating sign of how they're planning to blow all that money on things like hideous Koch-branded shirts, hydrofoils, and ways to impale birds, our aristocratic overlords have apparently discovered you can drink unfiltered water and are busy convincing themselves it's worth at least six bucks a gallon.

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Do you remember a time when life did not consist entirely of having your brain bludgeoned to mush with copies of The Art of the Deal? Nope? Didn't think so. Anyhow, our rapidly decaying consensus reality took another neuron-devastating blow this week with news that scientists at the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention must now grapple with a list of banned words.

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Since the earliest days of mobile phones, a small but steady contingent of environmental activists, conspiracy-inclined folks and some scientists have warned about the hidden damage they could be causing to our bodies, due to the radio frequency energy mobile phones use to communicate with cell towers. They fear that this non-ionizing radiation could penetrate our cells and cause damage, increasing our risk of brain and head cancer.

Shared from Lifehacker

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Hair grows back thicker when you shave it! Reading in dim light turns you blind! Peeing on a jellyfish sting will soothe the pain! The way our bodies work is a bit of a mystery, and our desire to unlock its secrets has led to a vast amount of misinformation. Many of these false notions are more widely believed than the truth. We took our healthy scepticism and a bunch of research to find the truth behind some of the most common myths about our bodies and our health. Here's what we learned.

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Corporeality can be, at times, pretty great. And yet for all its advantages, there are certain downsides to being trapped in a sack of rotting limbs and organs and eye-juice. For instance: Allergies. There are innocent people out there who can't pet a friendly dog without sneezing, or eat a peanut without instantly dying.

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The pendulum of scientific opinion swings pretty dramatically when it comes to the effect (if any) coffee has on our health.

But now a review of 200 separate studies has shown even three or four cups a day is still more likely to benefit your health than harm it. Woohoo!