Tagged With harvard

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Dr. George Church is a real-life Dr. Frankenstein. The inventor of CRISPR and one of the minds behind the Human Genome Project is no longer content just reading and editing DNA — now he wants to make new life. In Ben Mezrich's latest book, Wooly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive One of History's Most Iconic Extinct Creatures, Church and his Harvard lab try to do the impossible, and clone an extinct Woolly mammoth back into existence.

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Facebook founder and domestic travel enthusiast Mark Zuckerberg pretended to be a politician at his Harvard commencement address on Thursday afternoon. Not many people showed up, probably because it was cold and rainy and generally miserable outside. Not even Facebook can control the weather.

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In 1919, a holding tank filled with 2.3 million gallons of molasses ruptured and sent an enormous wave of goop through the streets of Boston. It enveloped and destroyed everything in its path — leaving 21 people dead and around 150 others injured. Until now, no one really knew why it was so deadly, but a team of scientists and students believe they have found a solution.

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Lasers and metal were part of 3D printing for decades before the machines became affordable for personal use. But researchers at Harvard are demonstrating a new technique by which 3D metal structures can be printed in midair, without the need for anything supporting them.

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Robots are often imagined as hard, shiny things, gleaming futuristic machines. They often are hard, shiny things. But sometimes they're softer than a baby butt and more flexible than an Illinois governor's morals. Soft robotics is a growing field devoted to the squishier side of automated technology, and with the help of a new toolkit, you can get in on the action.

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Since the first crude automatons running on clockwork mechanisms, mankind has been working to build the perfect artificial copy of ourselves for centuries. But what's a more accurate recreation of a human? A robot made of various components and wires all cobbled together? Or one made of billions of tiny robots all working together like the atoms that make up everything around us?