Tagged With hacking

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Season seven, episode four of Game of Thrones is now in the wild. The leaked video comes less than a week after HBO admitted that its servers had been hacked and a large quantity of data had been stolen. We already knew that a script -- or, more specifically, an outline of a script -- of episode four was part of the hack. Now, in a reportedly unrelated incident, it seems the Game of Thrones episode itself has been leaked.

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Famed white hat hacker Marcus Hutchins -- better known as "MalwareTech" -- was arrested by the FBI yesterday while trying to fly home to the United Kingdom from Las Vegas. The 22-year-old security researcher gained mainstream fame earlier this year as the guy who stopped the destructive WannaCry ransomware from spreading, and had been partying with friends near the Black Hat and Defcon hacker conferences before his arrest. Now, he faces serious federal charges for allegedly creating the Kronos banking trojan. But he's supposed to be the good guy!

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Well, this isn't terribly surprising. According to the latest dispatch from Variety, the hackers who broke into HBO's servers and stole 1.5 terabytes of data, including at least one Game of Thrones script, also stole employee data. More specifically, the hackers made off with "thousands of Home Box Office (HBO) internal company documents". That's bad.

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It's rare a day goes by without a story about leaks or cybercrime hitting the news. That's why companies pay top dollar for ethical hackers to keep cybercriminals far, far away from their sensitive networks. With demand for these professionals surging, now is the perfect time to break into the industry, and the Ethical Hacking A to Z Bundle can help make it happen.

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The '90s cyberpunk thriller Hackers is used too often to illustrate the fearful future of cyber security, but it's popular for a reason. The film's seemingly fictional scenarios keep coming true. Take this week's global ransomware attack, for instance. It's a plot twist that would make Matthew Lillard leer at the camera and cackle.

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If you had any doubt that Russian hackers attempted to meddle with the United States electoral system, a new report from Bloomberg is here to scare the crap out of you. Not only did Russia go after a voting software supplier in one state (as previously reported by The Intercept), Putin's cyber army reportedly targeted systems in 39 states. That's four out of five, for those of you keeping count.

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The seemingly local cyberattack that cut power to part of Ukraine's capital, Kiev, last December could have been a test run. And security researchers now say the malware believed to have caused the blackout is actually modular, mostly automated and highly adaptable. That means it doesn't just work on electrical grids in Ukraine. This dangerous cyberweapon might work in Sydney or Paris or New York -- anywhere really.

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Security research group Access Now has discovered a clever attack being used against influential social media users as a means of disseminating fake news. The "Doubleswitch" not only involves hijacking verified accounts but makes it extremely difficult for the legitimate owner to regain control of their handle.

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On Tuesday, US federal authorities announced that several members of the Tijuana-based Hooligans Motorcycle Club had been indicted for stealing $US4.5 million ($6 million) worth of Jeeps in San Diego County. How'd they do it? Stolen keys? Smash and grab operation? Nah. According to police, these bikers just gained access to a secure key database and then hacked the vehicles' onboard computers so that they could drive back to Mexico undetected.

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Ashley Madison is back... supposedly. The cheating site claims it added more than 400,000 global users last month, according to a New York Post report. The supposed growth is especially surprising given that the site experienced a massive data breach in July 2015 that exposed thousands of names and addresses of adulterers including thousands of government employees and conservative reality television star Josh Duggar.