Tagged With goes 16

NOAA and NASA's lovechild-slash-weather satellite, GOES-16, has been serving up some of the best images of Earth since it launched in November 2016. The satellite, which can take high quality images of Earth every 15 minutes, will be enormously helpful to meteorologists trying to predict extreme weather, which many climate scientists fear will increasingly become status quo.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

NOAA and NASA's lovechild-slash-weather satellite, GOES-16, has been serving up some of the best images of Earth since it launched in November 2016. The satellite, which can take high quality images of Earth every 15 minutes, will be enormously helpful to meteorologists trying to predict extreme weather, which many climate scientists fear will increasingly become status quo.