Tagged With globes

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If you have more air miles saved up than money in the bank, here's a clever way to keep track of every single country you've visited on your global travels. Basic origami skills are all that's needed to assemble this 3D cardboard globe featuring a gold foil outer layer that can be scratched off revealing the nations you've visited.

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= Jupiter is not only the largest planet in our solar system, it's also arguably the most stunning. Those massive storms — including that enormous red eye — produce quite an atmospheric show. And as a cheaper alternative to a giant telescope, this tiny desktop-sized version of Jupiter lets you stare in awe at the gas giant when you probably should be working.

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When Google Maps can deliver detailed views of the world with imagery that zooms right down to our backyards, they're can't be much demand for desk globes anymore. So a Japanese company called Gakken has taken its Worldeye globe to another level by turning it into a display that can show everything from weather patterns to stars.

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Yuri Suzuki has been travelling the world, using a dictaphone to collect local sounds of different countries since 2009. With these audio field notes, he's turned a globe into a record that plays these sounds when it spins for a 30-minute audio tour of the world called "The Sound of the Earth".