Tagged With foia request

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Back in August, I submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for a bunch of films held by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). We looked at one yesterday from 1976 about nuclear extortion, and we'll explore the others in the coming weeks. But there was one that I requested that the NNSA can't seem to find. The title? "Skull Melting Demonstration".

Today, tech nerds are obsessed with high-tech encryption. But if you ever send snail mail, you might want to take a tip from America's intelligence community. The CIA sends out letters that are secured with a specific type of tamper-proof tape -- think of it like low-tech encryption -- and we now know exactly what kind the CIA uses.

Light beer is as American as apple pie, and Miller Lite is one of America's favourite light beers. But what if I told you that the marketing man behind the creation of the Miller Lite brand was investigated by the FBI for being a communist? That's the startling revelation that has come to light based on newly released documents that I obtained today from the National Archives.

"Do you want to see Gough Whitlam's FBI file?" I said, walking into the other room where my wife was reading.

"Yes!" she said excitedly. My wife's Australian, and she knows I've been obsessed with figuring out what the FBI and CIA knew about former Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam's bizarre ouster as leader of the country in 1975. Whitlam's FBI file could hold clues to a mystery that's still as confounding today as it was 40 years ago.

Hedy Lamarr lived an extraordinary life. She was an actress who pushed boundaries, an inventor who went unappreciated in her time and a sex symbol who was very much appreciated in her time. And given the life she led in the 1940s you might expect her to have a rather thick FBI file. But you'd be wrong.