Tagged With film

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Video: It's obvious, right? In movies, the camera points us toward what we should look at. We follow the action by following the camera that's following the action of the scene. But camera movements in films can also make us feel something, too. If the camera pushes in, we're supposed to look closer. If it pulls out, we might be removing ourselves from the scene. The movement of the camera can go beyond just making us see something.

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Video: Roger Deakins is a cinematographer who's worked on films such as The Shawshank Redemption, No Country for Old Men, Sicario, Skyfall and many others that you've probably seen and loved. He has 13 Academy Award nominations for best cinematography and is responsible for so many beautiful shots and gorgeous films over the years that it's obvious that he's one of the most brilliant directors of photography ever. Just take a look at some of his work.

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Video: Directors make so many filmmaking decisions that go unnoticed by casual viewers because we're not paying close attention — but the use of colour isn't one of them. Colour immediately stands out. Films can be hyper colourful and smack you with the entire colour wheel, or they can be totally muted and monochromatic. You're able to recognise the aesthetic and intention and can see what the director wants to show you (provided you aren't blind or colourblind), because it's literally right in front of you.

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Video: Usually around the end of the year, I re-watch a few old movies I haven't seen in a while to remind myself of how awesome they are. I'm not sure why I do this (probably because most new movies aren't that great, I get reflective as the year ends and I get tired of watching old Christmas movies over the holidays). But after seeing this script to screen analysis from Glass Distortion of The Godfather, I know which classic film I'll be watching again this year.

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It's good to just stare at pretty images and forget the rest of the world exists sometimes. So take your time as you watch this edit by Jim Casey that is just one beautiful shot after another beautiful shot from all sorts of beautiful films. It covers a wide range of movies too: classics, recent blockbusters, old black and white, animation, foreign films, and more. If it was a good-looking shot, it's probably in here.

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Video: It's always nice (in a totally twisted way) to remind yourself of how bad things in the world could get by watching movies set in a post-apocalyptic future. They're always desolate and grim, lonely and uninviting, terribly sad and just plain awful places to live. I mean, seeing the last fictional characters on Earth trudge along a dead planet makes real life slightly more manageable. I think.

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Godzilla isn't just a Kaiju that's the king of the monsters. Godzilla doesn't just spend its time mindlessly destroying the world with its atomic breath in brain-numbing American remakes that no one should spend two hours watching. Or, fine, Godzilla is that in America. But in Japan, Godzilla represents so much more.

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Video: It's fairly easy to recognise a film made by Martin Scorsese: There are scenes in slow motion mixed with wonderful long tracking shots. The stories are often about gangsters or corruption or New York, and you can bet De Niro or DiCaprio will be in them. Oh and his movies almost always include overhead shots — or as Jorge Luengo Ruiz, the person who stitched together this video, calls it: "God's view." And you know God would definitely watch Scorsese.