Tagged With farming

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Back on a crisp January day in 2016, I slipped around on a frozen lake in Wisconsin to ask a bunch of portly men in grey hoodies and trucker hats how the fishing had been compared to when they were kids. Secretly, I wanted to know what they thought about the changing climate. The men had various backgrounds, many of them in agriculture, and nearly all noticed fewer ice fishing days than when they were kids. They detailed their thoughts in gruff what-is-this-kid-doing-here Wisconsin accents from folding chairs beside flopping future fillets.

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Chicken farmers in Tennessee are about to shed a lot of blood. After noticing an unusually high death rate in a flock, some Tyson Foods-suppliers discovered that they were dealing with a new bird flu outbreak. Don't worry too much, though: The USDA says humans should be safe.

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Agricultural robot Agbot II, designed and built by QUT with support from the Queensland Government, could save Australia's farm sector $1.3 billion a year by reducing the costs of weeding crops by around 90 per cent.

Farmers saw the robot in action at Bundaberg last week, when the fully-autonomous Agbot ll was demonstrated for the first time.

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Video: I could tell you that this hay floating in the air and spinning around in a circle is a result of a dust devil, where hot air rises up through a small pocket of cooler, low-pressure air above it (kind of like a harmless mini-tornado). Or I could tell you that it's obviously dark magic at work and the dust devil is actually trying to suspend as much hay as possible in the air to open a hole into another dimension. I don't know. You decide.

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Hey termites, we're not so different, you and I. Termites are usually one of the banes of human existence, as they feed on dead matter — such as the wood that we use to build our homes — but they supersede humans in one interesting way: they have been farming for millions of years longer than humans.

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Scientists have created three new genetically modified crops to combat three of the world's most troubling crop diseases. Each was tweaked in a slightly different way to be resistant to those specific diseases. The details appear in three new papers out today in Nature Biotechnology.

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For the last few years, the drought-stricken nation of Saudi Arabia has been responsibly cracking down on thirsty crops to conserve water. But their cows still need alfalfa, one of the most water-intensive crops around. To solve the problem, Saudi Arabia wants to grow its alfalfa in a land that apparently has plenty of water: California. Wait, what?