Tagged With explosions

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Astronomers spend their days looking at the sky. Maybe some crazy complex new telescope is helping, or some form of AI is teasing the complexities out of vast piles of data. It's still just the sky. The sky isn't immutable, though. Some of the most interesting science happens when brief blips pass into and out of existence. These dots send their light in the form of radio waves, microwaves, visible light and gamma rays into measuring apparatuses and tell us something new about the universe. They might even send space itself rippling with gravitational waves.

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I realise that airbags have saved countless lives since they were introduced in the early '70s, but that doesn't make the idea of having a giant pillow explode in your face any less terrifying. Especially after watching the explosive mechanism that fills an airbag in just 0.03 seconds detonate in super slow motion.

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The Earth, the Sun, Andromeda galaxy, they have all been around for as long as you can remember and as long as humanity has been around. So when a new light suddenly shows up in the distance, it's a weird occurrence. But a newly-detected explosion could be one of the weirdest - and it isn't the only one.

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Look up and you might see the bright constellation Cassiopeia trace a zig-zag across the sky as it seemingly always has. But almost 450 years ago, it was the source of surprise: A bright flash, Tycho's supernova, or "SN 1572" as scientists call it. This was one of the few supernovae humans have been able to see with their naked eyes throughout history. What caused the explosion is still unknown.

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For the first time, researchers say they have made a lithium-ion battery that uses a water-salt solution as its electrolyte and can reach the voltage needed to power household electronics and it doesn't come with the fire and the explosions and the arrgghh that is a risk with "some commercially available non-aqueous lithium-ion batteries".

The key to this battery? The special coating.

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Video: Unlike a battery, which stores power as chemical energy that's slowly and steadily discharged to keep your gadgets running, a capacitor can unload all of its juice in the blink of an eye. Even a small capacitor has the potential to stop your heart, but when it's the size of a dishwasher, well, this watermelon demonstrates exactly how destructive it can be.