Tagged With experiments

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Video: If you ever wanted to be a wizard, or just to try your hand at some magic tricks, you should learn the dark art of... static electricity. Yep, with a bit of strategic contact with certain objects, you can easily fool kids and probably even trick your drunk friend into thinking you can control objects through invisible forces.

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Video: Skittles' "taste the rainbow" tagline seems all the more appropriate when you arrange the colourful lollies in a ring on a plate and pour hot water over them. They immediately begin to melt and bleed colour, producing a rainbow design that's straight up magical without the need for a wand.

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Video: Gallium is one of those rare metals that turns to a liquid somewhere above room temperature, allowing you to do fun experiments — like pouring it onto a vibrating speaker while playing music — without risking severe burns. Point a camera at the results and that fun science experiment suddenly feels like you've discovered a distant alien world bubbling to life out of the fabric of the cosmos.

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Video: It's called the Schlieren effect and it means that you can see things that are invisible to the human eye, like changes in air density. So when you turn on a hair dryer, you can see the blast of air it shoots out. When you open a can of Coke, you can see what's escaping into the air. When you rub your hands, you can see the heat surrounding them.

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Video: Throw dry ice in everything just to see what happens, if you ask me. Crazy Russian Hacker put dry ice in some green slime and a bunch of bubbles started forming out of nowhere. The bubbles eventually pop in a small explosion of smoke but when they first appear underneath that muck of green goo, it's like seeing eggs spawn or something.

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Video: Liquid nitrogen is an endless source of fun. You can freeze things and smash things into pieces. Or you could pour it onto things and then watch the smoke monster move around and then smash things into pieces. Or you could dunk things in it and then watch the smoke disappear and then smash things into pieces. You get the point.

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Ah, in a tale as old as ice and fire, here's a liquid nitrogen 'squirt gun' versus a flamethrower. The Backyard Scientist outfitted a liquid nitrogen canister with a release valve that basically turns liquid nitrogen into a freeze ray death weapon of sorts (as in, the pressure makes the liquid nitrogen shoot out pretty strong). He pitted it up against a flame thrower to see how long it would take the liquid nitrogen shooter to win and it's quite the battle.