Tagged With electromagnetic interference

In September, China flicked the switch on the world's largest radio telescope. The unusually large dish in an isolated area of Guizhou province needs radio silence to hone in on potential signs of alien life and distant pulsars, but researchers fear that a huge influx of tourists could be rendering the ¥CN1.2 billion ($228 million) dish useless. Now, a choice between a booming local economy and the advancement of science looms on the horizon.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

In September, China flicked the switch on the world's largest radio telescope. The unusually large dish in an isolated area of Guizhou province needs radio silence to hone in on potential signs of alien life and distant pulsars, but researchers fear that a huge influx of tourists could be rendering the ¥CN1.2 billion ($228 million) dish useless. Now, a choice between a booming local economy and the advancement of science looms on the horizon.