Tagged With electric cars

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When Faraday Future showed off their FF 91 at CES earlier this year, there was really only one number they cared about: 2.39. That's got nothing to do with the car's range or anything like that. It's how many seconds it takes to get to 60mph from a standstill. Lucid made a big deal that their Air could get to 60 mph in 2.5 seconds, and now Tesla says they can do it in 2.389 seconds, a solid thousandth of a second faster than Faraday Future.

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Built from recycled materials, powered by an efficient electric motor, and now with a larger battery that promises to handle almost any long-distance journey without breaking a sweat, the BMW i3 is one of the most environmentally friendly cars you can buy. It's efficient when you drive it, and at the end of its life cycle a full 95 per cent can be returned to the earth from whence it came.

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Faraday Future is the mysterious Chinese-backed Silicon Valley auto startup that made its break a year ago disappointing the world at the last Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. Things don't look particularly good on that front at the moment.

Its most prestigious hire and top-listed executive, Marco Mattiacci of Ferrari fame, has reportedly left the company — just days away from a make-or-break production car debut at CES 2017.

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Speaking on behalf of floppy-haired environmentalists everywhere, angst man Morrissey urged General Motors to offer vegan-friendly versions of its hybrid and electric vehicles on Monday.

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If you'd dreamed of ordering yourself a Tesla and driving around the country without paying a cent for electricity, you'd better get your order in quick. With more and more of Tesla's Model S and Model X luxury electric cars appearing in driveways around Australia and around the world, the plucky little start-up from California has a plan to stop its fast-charging network of Superchargers from becoming clogged: it will stop offering free Supercharging to new owners from the start of 2017.

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As is fast becoming tradition for the Californian start-up electric car manufacturer, Tesla's latest incremental battery upgrade option for the Model S and Model X further improves the existing cars' range and acceleration — now to frankly ridiculous levels. The Tesla Model S P100D's new 100kWh battery pack, says Tesla, makes it the fastest accelerating production car... in the world. Well, the fastest car that you can buy right now, at least.

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Moving to electrical cars will only be feasible if they can go the daily distance, and luckily they usually can. A team of researchers looked at people's driving habits in a variety of cities, crunched the numbers and found that nine out of ten driving days could be completely powered by an overnight charge of a currently available electric car.

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This "electric carriage" which appeared in the 27 July 1889 issue of Scientific American was way ahead of its time. How ahead of its time was it? South Dakota wasn't even a state yet. The article that went along with it noted that the patent for this ingenious contraption was granted to one Mr Harvey D. Dibble of Rapid City, Dakota Territory.

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In Australia, Tesla's four-door, all-electric Model S luxury sedan starts at a hair over $100,000. The dual-motor all-wheel-drive version is $7500 more, coming in at a $108,300 sticker price before on-road costs like the Luxury Car Tax. The newer, larger, even more technology-packed Model X has just had its starting Australian price announced, and it's only a few thousand dollars more expensive. The starting price of the Model X in Australia will be $111,900, only 3 per cent more expensive than the equivalent-spec Model S.

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Tesla's newest, largest and first retail-only store in Australia has just opened to the public. Ahead of the store's unveiling, Gizmodo took a look at the electric car maker's premiere location in Australia, which occupies a prime position in Sydney's Martin Place, next door to Apple, with thousands of well-heeled pedestrians passing every day.

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Nissan's next-generation Leaf all-electric hatchback could be capable of driving well over 500km on a single charge, if indications on a recent concept car shown at the Tokyo Motor Show and an interview with Nissan's electric vehicle boss are any evidence. The IDS concept's battery is as twice as large as the current Leaf's 30kWh setup, and could push the small car to a range beating even the majority of current Tesla vehicles on Aussie roads.