Tagged With election interference

Facebook is creating a tool that will allow users to check whether or not they followed Russian propaganda accounts on Facebook or Instagram during the 2016 US election cycle, the company announced today. The tool, which is expected to launch by the end of this year, is a response to continued pressure from lawmakers who have demanded that Facebook be more transparent about election meddling on its platform.

Google, Facebook and Twitter, three of the world's most prominent tech companies, all testified before Congress this week that they had unintentionally been part of an alleged Russian operation to spread misinformation and propaganda during the 2016 presidential elections. On Saturday, Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell suggested that the companies involved could make good by helping the US government "retaliate" against Russia.

US Senate lawmakers on Thursday unveiled their first major legislative effort to increase transparency in online political advertising, called the Honest Ads Act. Sponsored by Senators Mark Warner, Amy Klobuchar, and John McCain, the bill attempts to align rules for online advertising with those broadcast on television and radio airwaves.

The first major legislative effort to rein in foreign interference in US elections will kick off Thursday afternoon on Capitol Hill, where Democratic Senators Mark Warner and Amy Klobuchar will field questions from reporters over a new bill crafted, they said, to "improve transparency of online political ads."

The Russia-funded political ads that ran on Facebook during the 2016 US election will be shown to the public, members of the House Intelligence Committee said today. US House and Senate committees are investigating ads that ran on Facebook, Twitter, Google and other platforms in an effort to determine how Kremlin-backed trolls organised their misinformation campaigns and whether the ads influenced the outcome of the US election.