Tagged With ecology

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For those who came here expecting the uncut version of Bee Movie, you're in the wrong place. This is a blog about some very unnerving bee-on-bee action — not some culmination of sexual tension between Renee Zellweger and Jerry Seinfeld's characters in the 2007 cult movie. Apparently, long-horned bees copulating is pretty unsettling and uh, there's video to prove it. I'm sorry.

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It seems like everything on this trash planet is doomed to go extinct before humans do, much to my chagrin. The woeful tale of New Zealand's yellow-eyed penguin is no different: The adorable bird — which even makes an appearance on the country's currency — is dangerously close to extinction, at least at one well-monitored mainland breeding ground. And it's (probably) all our fault.

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Extremely loud air gun blasts have not been used to hunt for oil deposits in the mid and south Atlantic ocean for the last 30 years, but since the industrial practices of the '80s are apparently in vogue again, on Wednesday the Trump administration restarted the application process to use seismic surveying. Environmentalists say the technology threatens surrounding deep sea ecosystems for thousands of kilometres.

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It's one of the biggest mysteries in this global experiment we're conducting by pouring 10 billion tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere each year: What will happen to the plants? Will the relentless burning of fossil fuels prompt our leafy green friends to suck down more CO2, tapping the brakes on climate change? Or are the trees unable to bail Earth's atmosphere out this mess?

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Carnivorous plants haven't have the best media representation. The 1986 cult classic Little Shop of Horrors depicted these hungry little darlings as bloodthirsty beasts, which isn't entirely inaccurate — depending on where they're located, carnivorous plants eat everything from flies to frogs.

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In case you thought we'd figured out life in the oceans even a little bit, a new study published in Nature Communications sets the record straight. For the first time, scientists have found experimental evidence of underwater pollination. There are bees in the sea — or at least creatures that perform the same kind of work.

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As Charles Darwin showed nearly 150 years ago, species can adapt to changing environmental conditions through the trial-and-error process of natural selection. A discouraging new study shows that climate change is happening too fast for evolution to keep up, placing countless plant and animal species at risk.

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This microscopic diplonemid doesn't look like much, but it's one of the most abundant single-celled hunters in the ocean. Researchers from the University of British Columbia have become the first to identify and photograph this surprisingly elusive — but ecologically important — sea creature.

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It isn't enough to halt global warming, but carbon-hungry plants are helping impede the buildup of CO2 in our atmosphere to a measurable degree, a new study has found. While this is a good thing and you should go thank a tree right now, the effect is probably temporary, speaking to how damn complicated our planet's response to climate change is going to be.