Tagged With dyson

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According to the Centre for Australian Weather and Climate research, air pollution inside our homes and buildings can be up to five times worse than outside. Considering that's where we spend 90 per cent of our time (maybe more, for homebodies like myself), maybe we should be thinking about this a little more.

Famous for its massive investments into research and development, I had a chat with Dyson's Global Product Development Director for Environmental Control, Paul Dawson, about what went into making the Pure Hot+Cold link, and how we can use smart homes and the Internet of Things to improve our lives.

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No one should need or want a $699 hair dryer. The number one hair dryer on Amazon costs $50, the one under my sink cost $90 in 2003, and the one my hair dresser uses daily on clients costs between $120 and $200. A $U699 hair dryer is more than twice the price of anything else, but that doesn't matter, because Dyson, a company best known for its fancy vacuums, has made a hair dryer, and the damn thing might be the last you'll ever need.

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If you looked at buying a new cordless vacuum any time in the last couple of years, chances are you considered Dyson's V6 handstick — a gadget that we absolutely love, and regularly use, for keeping small apartments and living spaces clean without the hassle of a power cord. A few months after launching the same model internationally, the brand new Dyson V8 has hit Australia, and it makes some pretty damn useful improvements on an already good design.

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Pre-orders for Dyson's super fancy hair dryer are now open in Australia. From today you can put your cash down on the $699 Supersonic, which will hit retailers 9 July.

We got hands on with the Supersonic at its launch in Japan this April, checking out its intelligent heat control to help protect hair from extreme heat damage, fast yet focused airflow, engineering designed for balance and fabled lack of excessive noise.

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We've been thinking about lighting the wrong way for years, apparently. Desk lamps with shades over globes, downlights in household ceilings, fluorescent light fixtures in offices. Jake Dyson, son of renowned inventor Sir James Dyson, and an entrepreneur and inventor in his own right, has turned his attention to making a better light — and fixing the way that designers use light in home and office spaces alike.

"It's not about seeing the light," he tells Gizmodo. "It's about seeing the result of the light."

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We called Dyson's cordless DC59 Motorhead the first genuine replacement for a full-sized vacuum, even with a few annoying design quirks and limited battery life. It has taken the company almost two years to design a follow-up, but the new Dyson V8 appears to fix most of the complaints we had with the original.

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Each new week brings with it an abundance of new gadgets — whether devised by tech giants like Google and Samsung or pushed by hopeful entrepreneurs to Kickstarter, they run the gamut from useful to niche to tech that nobody really needs. This week we're looking at gadgets that wouldn't be out of place in a high-tech sci-fi — though some of them should have stayed a fiction.

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The path of an inventor is not an easy one. From his first invention in the 70's (it was the Ballbarrow — a wheelbarrow with a ball) to his latest "baby", the Supersonic hairdryer, Sir James Dyson has forged his own way.

If you want to follow in his footsteps, be warned — its not for everyone. We sat down for a chat with the man who sees failure, obstacles and complaints as positives.

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They say it's powerful, light, safe and quiet. Supersonic is Dyson's brand new foray into the world of hair care, and while it is at its core a hairdryer, what it represents is so much more.

It is taking a product that has been around forever, looking at its flaws with a critical eye, and setting out to fix them — with science. But does it live up to the promises? I took a closer look to find out.

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Dyson — the British company famous for its vacuum cleaners and Air Multiplier fans — has invested almost $95 million, enlisted 103 engineers, built 600 prototypes, and has over 100 patents pending, all into the creation of a hairdryer.

It's one of those things that doesn't seem to make sense — and then, suddenly, it does. And it's not just because vacuum cleaners were once the only option for drying hair.

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Dyson makes good vacuum cleaners. Dyson makes complicated vacuum cleaners, but all that complex engineering work doesn't really matter to the customer that buys one. At the end of the day, it's just a vacuum cleaner, and it just has to do the vacuuming. Being complex also means being simple, really.

To demonstrate this, Dyson and Gizmodo teamed up to take a new Dyson Cinetic Big Ball apart, and then put it back together. To be specific, Dyson did the taking apart bit, and I tried the putting back together bit.

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Dyson has a new vacuum, and it's the British company's most advanced yet — but in ways that you might not expect. The new Cinetic Big Ball won't lose suction or clog up with dust or hair thanks to its incredibly well engineered Cinetic oscillating tips, but a vacuum isn't exactly useful if you can't move it around with you. The new Big Ball is smaller, cheaper and sleeker than the old model, and always cleans the dust bin out on the first go, but anyone that's dragged a big vacuum around a house behind them will love this bit: it just can't tip over.

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Dyson had a good 2015. Australia is responsible for a moderate chunk of the company's $850 million (£448 million) in yearly profit, but a lot of that comes from Dyson's battery-powered V6 handstick vacuums — sales grew by 35 per cent in Australia. Dyson is putting that money back into making its gadgets better, though — including nearly $2 billion over five years for research into better batteries.

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A month ago, Dyson and Airbnb teamed up to run a competition — something between a guessing game and a treasure hunt, or a real-life version of GeoGuessr. The prize was a weekend's stay in an unlisted, one-of-a-kind Airbnb listing — which turned out to be a pop-up apartment on the roof of Tonic House in Melbourne, stacked full of Dyson gadgets and inventor James Dyson's design icons.

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LED lamps consume a miniscule fraction of the energy of incandescent or fluorescent globes to create light, but the heat generated as a byproduct of the process is detrimental to the diodes' long-term life span. Jake Dyson, the son of prolific inventor and engineering genius James Dyson, was involved in the development of Dyson Lighting's CSYS lamp — boasting a 154,000 hour life, or 37 years of use — that will be released in Australia in 2016.

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The winners of this year's James Dyson Award have been announced, and Australia's deserving student design project victor is Sarah Heimeier, an industrial design student at RMIT — whose Jana is a wearable ultrasonic sensor that can monitor an expectant mother and baby's heartbeat, blood pressure and glucose levels. Aimed at pregnant women in rural parts of Australia without easy and constant access to medical care, Jana works with a smartphone to transmit vital information to doctors, giving early warning of any potential complications like preeclampsia.