Tagged With consumer tech

All of a sudden, it seems like almost no one is making laptops like Alienware makes laptops: beefy, loud, and fast. Most of the top gaming laptop makers have embraced the design style popularised by Razer and supported by Nvidia’s Max-Q design ethos: thin and sacrificing a little power for portability. But not Alienware man. This company is still making laptops that are lap in name only, and the Alienware m15, in particular, stands out, because it’s really big, it’s really powerful. And as it turns out, it’s surprisingly portable.

The concept of today’s smart, connected wearables just didn’t exist back in the 1980s when text-only operating systems like MS-DOS were still popular. But that didn’t stop Puma from releasing what was possibly the world’s first modern fitness tracker by strapping a chunky computer to the back of a sneaker. Thirty-two years later, Puma is bringing those kicks back with the same design, but with updated tech inside.

The Razer Blade Stealth has always been a pretty dang nice 13-inch laptop. Not the best laptop, and not the worst. A good alternative for people who want slick Mac-like design in a Windows computer. With its latest refresh of the Stealth, Razer is wisely moving away from its Apple influences and has started borrowing more from its friends in Windows-land. The result is one sharp looking laptop.

The HP Spectre Folio is deceptive. Closed it looks like a fancy leather folder business types take to conference rooms. Held in your hands, it’s smooth and rich feeling under your fingertips, but heavier than you’d expect. It opens exactly as a laptop should, but then when moving it into its tablet mode, you find you’re pulling the display towards yourself instead of doing 360-degree gymnastics. It’s weird. Confusing. But also natural? If laptop makers are dead set on making laptops double as tablets, then this one’s figured it out.

Google’s software-first design philosophy has brought about some impressive results—like the kind of pictures you can snap with a Pixel 3, but that strategy can also have some negative impacts too, especially when it comes to bugs. More software solutions mean more potential bugs to break your phone.

The year is winding down, and it’s very unlikely Microsoft will announce another major product, so naturally, we need to look forward to 2019 and beyond. Brad Sams of Thurrot has plenty of delectable rumours in his new book Beneath a Surface. Some his claims about Microsoft’s product roadmap reinforce things we’ve heard before, while other bits are entirely new.

Without the internet instantly dispersing images to millions of people, it was probably a lot easier to keep video game prototypes under wraps in the ‘80s. Just a handful of photos backed up rumours about the possible existence of a miniature version of the ill-fated Vectrex console, but it’s a rumour no more now that the National Video game Museum in Frisco, Texas has managed to get its hands on that mythical prototype for its collection.

Even though LG has put out a respectable line of phones in 2018, sales for the company’s mobile division continue to struggle.

So in an effort to rejuvenate its business, alongside an increased focus on robotics and autonomous vehicles, LG have announced that LG Home Entertainment President Brian Kwon will also be taking control of LG Mobile starting December 1.

Chromebooks aren’t supposed to cost a lot of money. That’s a big reason we like them! They’re always good enough, and they’re always cheap—think under $1000. But the Pixel Slate, which carries the newest build of Chrome OS, has made a near perfect case for a pricier chromebook.

This tablet, which turns into a laptop with the addition of a $US160 to $US200 accessory, starts at $US600 and often works so well as either laptop or tablet that it feels like it’s almost always worth the price.

Even though I know all these retro consoles are largely an effort turn my nostalgia into big-time corporate profits, they’re damn hard to resist. There’s just something about grey plastic and the old school boot up sound that hits a deep part of my brain as few things do, so when I heard Sony was making a retro revival of the original PlayStation, I thought “Great, another mini console to add to the collection.” But after getting to check out Sony’s take on a throwback gaming machine, I feel a bit shortchanged.

There’s just something about this phone. From the moment I laid my eyes on this thing, it just kind of made me happy. It’s small and adorable like a newborn puppy, and despite how petite it appears it photos, it looks and feels even smaller in person. And I’m not the only one that had this reaction. When I brought it into the office, people crowded around marveled. One person cooed at it, another said, “it’s perfect,” while a third remarked that this is the exact sort of thing they’d wished someone would make for years.