Tagged With cold war

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The overdrawn game of nuclear chicken between the USSR and the United States — now known as the Cold War — lasted about 45 years. While neither superpower ever deployed nukes on each others' soil, high-altitude bomb testing caused a kerfuffle in Earth's atmosphere. Though the conflict has (thankfully) long since ended, newly declassified information suggests it might have impacted space weather in ways we never anticipated.

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What's old is unfortunately new again: Recently, two US military officials said that America should be getting ready for a war in space, a sentence I am ashamed to write in the year 2017. Their advice was seemingly bolstered by a Hill article penned by two US national security experts this week, which reminded Americans that North Korea could in theory use a satellite weapon to send an electromagnetic pulse over the United States, triggering widespread blackouts and ultimately, societal collapse. It seems like all those Cold War fears Baby Boomers have repressed for decades are finally getting their chance!

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Fox News will air Sean Hannity's interview with Julian Assange today — the Wikileaks founder who's currently hiding in Ecuador's embassy in London. Fox & Friends talked about the interview this morning, but if you take a look at the banner above, we're practically in a second Cold War.

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Video: There's a fascinating backstory about the building that is now the US National Audiovisual Conservation Center, which is where the Library of Congress stores all 6.3 million pieces of the library's movie, television and sound collection. It used to be a nuclear bunker that stored $US4 billion ($5.3 billion) during the Cold War. Now, it's a one-stop shop for all things regarding film preservation and restoration, with kilometres of shelves stacked with film reels to the ceilings; all sorts of machines that can repair film, process film and print film; and any sort of video player you can imagine to play any sort of format that ever existed.

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Guy Sims Fitch had a lot to say about the world economy in the 1950s and '60s. He wrote articles in newspapers around the globe as an authoritative voice on economic issues during the Cold War. Fitch was a big believer in private American investment and advocated for it as a liberating force internationally. But no matter what you thought of Guy Sims Fitch's ideas, he had one big problem. He didn't exist.

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On 23 May 1967, the United States Air Force scrambled to ready nuclear missile-laden aircraft for deployment. Radar systems designed to detect incoming Soviet missiles had just been disrupted, in what the military perceived to be an act of war. But before any nukes were launched in retaliation, it seems Air Force command was told to stand down.

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In July 1959, the magazine Look ran an article describing the "miracle kitchen" of the future, ostensibly about the amazing advances that Americans would see in their own homes. In reality, it was part of a much larger propaganda battle of the Cold War — and it involved a proto-roomba.

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Ever contemplated going to war with America but been thwarted when the Great Satan switched off your access to its navigation satellites? That's potentially a real problem for China and Russia, but the real victor in this navigational arms race might be you; it's improving the quality of location data on your phone and in your car.

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Americans were obsessed with spy culture during the Cold War. I mean, who didn't love James Bond? Communists, that's who. The gosh darn Communits. Spying seeped into every aspect of pop culture in the 1960s and '70s — from TV and movies to comic books and even board games.