Tagged With codecs

5

Viewers of Silicon Valley will appreciate the earth-shattering importance of compression algorithms. To most everyone else, it's a geeky bit of maths that's of no particular interest. But when Google promises an algorithm that can cut the bandwidth needed to stream a video in half, things get a little more interesting.

13

As the ongoing Meerkatification of humanity proves, the internet (in one form or another) is becoming more and more about video. At peak times, Netflix and YouTube alone account for half of all web traffic. That's an understandably huge burden for ISPs to carry. But as well as making the pipes bigger, we can also shrink down what goes through them.

16

Apple Maps still needs work if it wants to supplant Google's offering, but one thing it has gotten right is the use of vector data over raster images. When it comes to downloading new information or zooming in and out, Apple Maps is the superior product. So why not use vectors for say, encoding video, where its space-saving and quality-preserving benefits would be just wonderful? Don't worry, science is onto it.

5

From now on, any video you upload to YouTube will be transcoded into Google's WebM codec, joining the "videos that make up 99 per cent of views on the site or nearly 30 per cent of all videos". Google explains it to the non-tech savvy folk like so.