Tagged With cia

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There's more than one moment in the 2006 thriller The Good Shepherd, when any rational movie watcher thinks, "Crap, does Matt Damon know what he's doing, setting up the CIA as the most powerful spy agency in the world?" Those doubts, however, seem quaint thanks to the recent revelation that a crew of CIA contractors crafted a scheme to steal thousands of dollars worth of snacks from the agency's snack machines.

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Thanks to Wikileaks, you may have seen a quote from President Kennedy recently about his desire to "splinter the CIA in a thousand pieces and scatter it to the winds". Wikileaks used the quote as the password to decrypt its latest release about CIA spy tools. And the quote can be found in news stories around the world, including in some from The Intercept. The only problem? The origin of the quote is a bit dubious.

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Here we go again, gumshoes. WikiLeaks (read: Julian Assange) says it acquired a massive cache of CIA documents related to the agency's cyberwar efforts. The information therein, WikiLeaks claims, reveals covert CIA hacking tools that can take over iPhones, Android phones, TVs and pretty much any type of computer. It's scary stuff — if you believe what WikiLeaks is saying is true.

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After years of fighting with FOIA requesters, the CIA has finally uploaded over 12 million documents to its website. While many of the documents have been declassified for some time, the pages were intentionally hard to access, and only available on a few computers sitting at the National Archives. But now, anyone can search the documents from anywhere.

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On Friday the CIA, FBI and NSA released a joint report alleging that Russian foreign intelligence services used disinformation campaigns and cyberattacks to help get Donald Trump elected. But this morning the Kremlin shot back. And they used words pretty identical to Donald Trump in the process.

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During the Cold War, the United States fought a war of information (and disinformation) against communism. The lead agency of that war was the United States Information Agency (USIA), the propaganda arm of the US government, which was dissolved in 1999. But now James Clapper, the US Director of National Intelligence, says the US needs that group again. Actually, he just told Congress that they need a "USIA on steroids".

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There are a lot of different conspiracy theories about what happened to the Australian government in November of 1975. In a surprise move, the ultra liberal Prime Minister Gough Whitlam was fired by a lone man using parliamentary procedures that no one had expected. That man was John Kerr. And Gizmodo has now obtained the CIA's internal biographic report on him.