Tagged With ces2018

The world's biggest whirlwind of tech, startups and wild fever dreams is finally over, at least for this year. But before we close the book on CES 2018, we wanted to call attention to some of the coolest, most exciting things we saw at the show. That's because even in a down year that saw less new laptops, and the hottest tech trend (for the second year in a row) was companies trying to shove Alexa or Google Assistant into every single device, there's still a lot to look forward to over the next 12 months.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

This might look like a TV. It's a big 165cm display capable of HDR and putting out 1000 nits of brightness. It even uses a quantum dot film to achieve DCI-P3 colour gamut, which is nerd speak for really good colour reproduction that's usually only found super expensive TVs. But this display is one of three new Big Format Gaming Displays Nvidia announced at CES. This thing is meant to be a gaming monitor first, and yes, shockingly, that does make a difference.

Do you remember back in the '90s, when high-definition TVs first started to become popular? Seeing that HD for the first time, the sharpness seemed almost impossible compared to existing technology. But this year, several top tech companies showed off 8K screens with 16-times as many pixels as those old 1080p HD TVs. For me, seeing these new super sharp TVs at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) felt like the first time all over again.

Shared from The Sydney Morning Herald

I first spotted Ruslan Kogan at McCarran International Airport, surrounded by what appeared to be nerdy groupies, before the craziness that was the week-long CES tech show in Las Vegas. The outspoken CEO, always dressed in a t-shirt emblazoned with some kind of geeky slogan, is easy to spot in a crowd.

The new, modular Technics SP-10R turntable plays records just like any other turntable. But, according to Technics, it plays records really, really, really well. It better since it's priced at $US10,000 and up depending on just how you configure it. But the introduction of yet another Technics tribute model - or collector's item if you're being honest with yourself - makes you wonder. What exactly is this legendary audio company trying to do?

After covering CES for 10 years, nothing I've seen at the show has me as excited about the future as Ossia's wireless charging technology. The company's developed a way to deliver power to your gadgets the same way internet is delivered by wi-fi, and one of the first real-world applications of the tech is a AA battery that may never need replacing.

One of the recent trends in Bluetooth speakers is the addition of colourful LEDs that blink and flash along with whatever music's playing. But a company called Victrola has done something way out of left field by putting an animated Pin Art display on top of its new wireless speaker.

The first thing that I should say about FORPHEUS is that it's gentle. The artificially intelligent Ping-Pong tutor built by Omron is not trying to beat you. It's not trying to take over the world. FORPHEUS is trying to make you a better Ping-Pong player. I played Ping-Pong with this incredibly futuristic being, and not only do I feel like a better Ping-Pong player. I feel better about the potential for a robot-led future.

In the future, you'll be able to start your car simply by looking into the rear-view mirror. At least, that's one way iris-authentication technology could change the way we interact with our cars, as biometrics company Fingerprints and their partners Gentex have announced a long-term deal to bring the technology to the automotive industry at CES2018.

With New Year's resolutions still fresh in everyone's minds, Peloton announced its second major product on Tuesday: A treadmill. Except, as Peloton CEO John Foley explained to me at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, the new Peloton Tread is more than a running machine. It's being billed as a private fitness studio, one that offers the ability to take a variety of exercise classes streamed live from the company's studios in Manhattan. It will also set you back four grand, plus a monthly fee of $US39 if you want access to the live classes. The craziest detail of all? It almost feels worth it.

There was once a time when Sony's Xperia phones were some of the slickest, most fashionable Android phones out there, thanks to their stylish, minimalist designs and trend-setting features like water-resistance way back in 2013. Somewhere along the line, the company got stuck in a rut, and despite having phones with impressive specs, Sony's inability to fix critical mistakes caused its handsets to fall out of favour.

When the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive came out in 2016, we entered a new era of virtual reality. No longer would people think of half-assed fever dreams like Lawnmower Man, or ambitious but profound failures like Nintendo's Virtual Boy anytime VR gets mentioned. Even so, modern VR still hasn't caught on. It's awkward, it's expensive, and most of the games and apps still feel like tech demos. But earlier this week, a new piece of VR tech reminded me why the headsets are much more than gimmicks.