Tagged With censorship

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LiveJournal, a blog community that's hosted a lot of science fiction authors and fans (including George RR Martin), has officially banned "political solicitation" — which can mean anything that criticises the Russian government, as well as pro-LGBTQ discussions. There are also concerns users can be subject to Russian spying.

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Twitter claimed in a blog post last week that it will be "introducing additional updates that leverage our technology to reduce abusive content". Today, what appears to be a limited rollout of one such feature — the involuntary walling off of certain accounts behind an opt-in prompt — has the platform's users angry and confused.

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Doctor Strange has gotten heavy criticism for its decision to change The Ancient One's ethnicity from Tibetan to Celtic, essentially whitewashing the character. But the issue was also about removing Tibet from the title character's origin to avoid offending China, and secure the film's release there. Turns out it worked — Doctor Strange will arrive in China on November 4, the same day it's opening in the US.

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You probably recognise Nick Ut's infamous 1972 photograph of charred Vietnamese children running away from the site of a napalm incidienary bomb detonated by the South Vietnamese Air Force in Trang Bang. Earlier this week, however, Facebook effectively banned the Pulitzer-winning photograph from its own site. Now the site is backtracking as quickly as it can.

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Well, damn. China has reportedly banned people from seductively eating bananas on film. I am devastated. According to state news outlet CCTVNews, the country has banned people from live-streaming their consumption of the delicious yellow fruit.

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In The Westport Independent you play as the editor of an independent newspaper, twisting stories to suit the agenda of those you are loyal to. You can't exactly lie in what you choose to print — but you don't have to publish the truth. And what you decide to publish will change how citizens feel about the people in power and those who oppose them.

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The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has approved the use of the 451 HTTP status code for websites that are inaccessible for legal reasons such as government censored content or blocked copyrighted material. There are limitations as to whether internet users in different geographical regions will see this error code but the approval of 451 is an acknowledgement of the prevailing issues of internet censorship and online piracy.