Tagged With bugs

The seemingly endless string of iOS bugs is a sickness that just won't go away. Just a month ago, people discovered that a strange hyperlink could cause Messages to crash. And while that issue has been patched, a new bug has appeared that can wreck Messages, along with a number of other major apps.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

There's small screwups and big screwups. Here is tremendously huge screwup: Virtually all Intel processors produced in the last decade have a major security hole that could allow "normal user programs - from database applications to JavaScript in web browsers - to discern to some extent the layout or contents of protected kernel memory areas," the Register reports.

Ever since it launched in September, iOS 11 has been riddled with glitches, bad UI decisions and general lack of attention to detail. On Friday night, Apple's problems got a little worse with a notifications bug that sent iPhones and iPads running the software into a constant cycle of crashing and rebooting, forcing Apple to issue an immediate update.

A single seared prawn sat atop a scoop of mashed avocado with a healthy scoop of salty black specks overflowing onto the plate beside it. If I didn't already know what I had gotten myself into, I would have been certain the topping was caviar -- each spot popped just like a sturgeon egg might have. But rather than fishiness came an alien citrus flavour unlike any meat I'd ever tasted. After all, I was eating black ants.

Plenty of people have described Hurricane Harvey as a disaster of biblical proportions, and it seems the next plague is upon the US. It isn't locusts. Thanks to untold quantities of filthy standing water, millions of mosquitoes are starting to hatch. And yes, they do bite. They love to bite.

When taking high-resolution 3D scans of insects, scientists typically have to kill their test subjects, which isn't always ideal. By taking advantage of an insect's ability to survive oxygen-poor conditions, scientists have now used carbon dioxide to keep bugs in a state of suspended animation for upwards of seven hours at a time -- and with no apparent side effects.

You might not know this, but we're in the midst of an insect shape-studying renaissance. MicroCT technology -- basically a lab version of the CAT scanners found at hospitals -- is increasingly allowing scientists to produce detailed three-dimensional images without destroying samples. So naturally, if we're scanning everything, we might as well scan grasshopper genitalia mid-bang.

We ate some weird stuff in 2016. A person born in the year 1000 AD definitely wouldn't comprehend a Dorito. He certainly wouldn't understand why kids love the taste of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, and if you showed him a Twinkie, he'd probably burn you at the stake. But the way things are headed, our food is bound to get a lot weirder.