Tagged With browsers

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You may have noticed in your travels around the internet that your browser's address bar occasionally turns green and displays a padlock — that's HTTPS, or a secure version of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol, swinging into action. This little green padlock is becoming vitally important as more and more of your online security is eroded. Just because your ISP can now see what sites you browse on doesn't mean they have to know all the content your consuming. Below is the rundown on HTTPS, so you can better understand this first, and easiest line of defence against potential snoopers and hackers.

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Not all applications and browser add-ons come in peace. So you need to know a few warning signs to look out for if you want to make sure that only legit software makes it onto your machine. Here's how to avoid bad actors and weed out any shady apps that have already taken root.

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If your device, your carrier, and your data plan allows it, you can turn your mobile phone into a Wi-Fi hotspot to get your laptop online. But just because it's a hotspot doesn't mean the rules of data uses don't apply. You'll still want to keep data usage down to a minimum. Here's how you can enjoy all the perks of a mobile hotspot without wrecking your wallet.

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Mozilla has a new logo, the latest in the company's effort to rebrand itself as a modern technology outfit worthy of your attention. It's no surprise that the company reaching to stay relevant in the face of plunging usage of its key product, the internet browser Firefox. Somewhere out there is a designer who still uses Adobe Pagemaker and is very proud of their work on this logo. The rest of us are wondering where the hell the Mozilla we used to know has gone.

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Firefox was fighting the good fight against Internet Explorer long before Chrome showed up, and since its launch in 2002, Mozilla's famed browser has been attracting third-party developers in their droves. The add-ons and plug-ins are what make Firefox the powerhouse browser it is, and these are some of the very best you can install.

Shared from Kotaku

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Chrome might be the default browser for the internet at large, but it's not the only one. And it's also not without its frustrations. Chrome - at least until the most recent update - had a habit for using a metric ton of RAM. It wasn't the de facto king of speed. And the odd tab crashing was enough to cause many a pegged stress ball.

In my fury, I did the unthinkable: I switched to the devil himself, Microsoft Edge. And I persisted for a whole week, migrating my whole workflow to the world of Microsoft. It only lasted a week, and came to a swift end when I'd finally had my fill of the things Edge couldn't do.

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Google doesn't just want the Chrome browser dominating laptops and desktops of this world, it wants it on as many mobile devices as possible too. If you have Chrome installed on your iPhone or Android, there are a handful of ways you can make it even better than the default settings. Here's how to make sure you're getting the most from the Chrome browser on your mobile devices.

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There's a lot of stuff out there on the web, and you want to be able to get around all of it fast. You can of course make use of your mouse but there are always times when a keyboard combo is more efficient and more convenient. The ones we've listed here have all been tested with Google Chrome, but many will work with other browsers too.

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Isn't the web a wonderful place for exploring? Just like any other appealing destination though, if you don't keep yourself safe, the attraction quickly wears off. Thankfully, you don't need a degree in advanced networking to protect yourself online — you just need to read and take heed of these 12 security tips, which should minimise the risk of something going wrong.

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I know, Microsoft Edge is basically a rebranded Internet Explorer, and for that reason alone most people stay a full barge-pole length away from Window's default browser. But thanks to some upcoming changes, it might stop sucking so bad.